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Word Definitions & Usage

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  • In this lesson, we take a look at what the grammatical function of a noun is. We also take a detailed look at all five functions of a noun, and give simple examples to deepen your understanding.

    Functions of Nouns

    Functions of Nouns

    by myvenn4

  • These contemptuous F-Words are divided into subsections for describing people, animals and things, also for use as verbs. Meanings are added for those who are interested in learning something new.

    50 Unfriendly F-Words You Can Say Instead

    50 Unfriendly F-Words You Can Say Instead

    by Dora Weithers60

  • The English language abounds with expressions that have been in common usage for so long that everyone knows exactly what they mean. Known as idioms, many of these expressions have surprising origins.

    10 Common English Idioms and Their Surprising Origins.

    10 Common English Idioms and Their Surprising Origins.

    by Stephen Barnes4

  • The differences between British and American English are reflected primarily in the use of vocabulary, grammar, spelling, and punctuation. This hub relates experience with Brits and British English.

    Differences Between British and American English

    Differences Between British and American English

    by Paul Richard Kuehn127

  • According to American poetaster, Robert Bly, American readers "can't tell when a man is counterfeiting and when he isn't." What might this view of one's audience imply for one's artistic integrity?

    Robert Bly Redefines the Image:  Imagism vs Picturism

    Robert Bly Redefines the Image: Imagism vs Picturism

    by Linda Sue Grimes0

  • The English language is a fertile place for those who play with words; William Shakespeare, Lewis Carroll, and even Marshall McLuhan found puns irresistible.

    The Ancient Humour of Puns

    The Ancient Humour of Puns

    by Rupert Taylor1

  • Indirect speech is also known as Reported Speech, Indirect Narration or Indirect Discourse. In grammar, when you report someone else’s statement in your own words without any change in the meaning of the statement is called indirect speech. Quoting a person’s words without using his own word and bringing about any change in the meaning of the statement is a reported speech.

    Direct and Indirect Speech with Detailed Explanation

    Direct and Indirect Speech with Detailed Explanation

    by Muhammad Rafiq23

  • Two little Latin terms, i.e. and e.g., have been playing the “We look alike, but we are actually different.” game for a long time, and this is my take to explain their differences.

    The Actual Difference Between i.e. and e.g.

    The Actual Difference Between i.e. and e.g.

    by Rafael Baxa6

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