CorrespondenceWritingQuotationsPoetryBooksCreative WritingNewspapers & Magazines

Write for Cash Anywhere Using Constant Content and Textbroker

Updated on August 31, 2017

The appeal of writing for cash from just about anyplace on the planet needs no explanation. If you like the itinerant lifestyle or just want to make a bit of extra cash while you're travelling or on holiday, writing for cash in many ways fits the bill. Of course, if you're really going to take writing to the next level, you will write any place whether home or away. But for me, one of the greatest appeals of making a little extra this way lies in the fact that I can lie on the beach in Goa, write a few articles as the winds of inspiration take me, and then sell them later.

I've little doubt that you're aware that there are sites out there that facilitate that lifestyle. I've tried writing for a few of them and write here about my findings, including the site where I posted my articles written on a Goan beach which nicely funded a few nights out while I was there on holiday.

Constant Content

A favourite for many writers trying to make some extra cash online, and in some cases a living, is Constant Content. There are many positive things to say about this writing platform, not least of which is the fact you can set your own prices. The manual supplied to writers suggest that articles tend to priced at around 10 cents per word, although you'll have to discern how to fix your price at based on research involved and so on. Some articles will command more pay than others.

Another great facet to Constant Content is that you can write about anything you want which is great if you like to go with inspiration. Like I mentioned, there were times on holiday when I suddenly felt inspired to write something. I tend to get it all down in note form on my Smartphone while the idea is still fresh, then fine tune it later, and finally submit it. I've sold quite a few articles this way and been pleasantly surprised by a quick sale. While you can write about practically anything you think will sell, Constant Content don't accept articles written in the first person, which is understandable given that the articles are up for sale for others to use.

Clients can also post requests for articles which you can apply for either by submitting the finished piece, or be applying by submitting your credentials and experience. You can also check recent searches to get an idea of what clients are looking for right now.

Some writers have been put off because of the strict application of grammar and punctuation. Constant Content's high standards work to a serious writers advantage, though, as it means clients know they're getting top quality and are prepared to pay accordingly, making you much more per word than a content mill.

Source

Textbroker

I know many writers regard content mills as anathema, but some are better than others. I quite enjoy writing for Textbroker (in my case, Textbroker UK) since it's so straightforward. You sign up with a sample which is duly evaluated between 2, 3 and 4 points (nobody will be designated 5 at this stage, but if you know better, let us know). My little piece was a travel piece about Krakow and I was assigned to level 3. After writing a few articles for real, I was given a boost up to level 4 where I have remained.

To select a job you just check out what's available on the jobs board, and select anything you like the look of at your level or below. I tend to enjoy writing the travel pieces and have written many articles on all manner of destinations, many of which I have visited, and many I haven't. You don't have to limit yourself just to places you've personally been to as it's easy to research a place and put an article together. I tend to keep my research and articles for use later.

On more than one occasion I've written a piece for Textbroker, then rewritten it from a different angle using the same research with maybe a few more facts thrown in for Constant Content. If you combine these writing platforms ethically, you can make your writing go much further.

If you can make it up to level 5 on Textbroker, the pay is considerably better. It seems that to get to level 5 you need to pass a rather gruelling grammar and style test. If you fail, you have to wait another 3 months before you can have another attempt. I haven't managed to pass this thus far despite trying numerous times. Maybe you'll have more success. If so, let us know.

You can also join teams of writers either by applying or by being invited, where you set your own rate. These have the advantage of allowing you to pick more than one job at a time in contrast to the jobs posted on the open jobs board. These jobs range from product descriptions to travel to business pieces. You will often see product descriptions on there, which while not utterly inspiring, they're quick to write and are a good way to practise tightening up your writing while earning a little extra cash as you go.

Textbroker is definitely worth a go, particularly if you use your research for the articles you write for recycling later on. You could almost think of it as a paid ideas generator.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.