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Tips to Cure Blank Brain and Get Rid of That Foggy Feeling

Updated on September 24, 2017
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Janis is a licensed professional counselor in Washington, DC. Areas of specialty include grief, loss, life transition, and trauma recovery.

What's That Foggy Feeling in My Head?

Drawing a blank in the brain is frustrating when you have a work to do.
Drawing a blank in the brain is frustrating when you have a work to do. | Source

Drawing A Blank Brain

When does your brain draw the most blanks?

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What is Blank Brain?

We've all experienced it at one time or another. It's that dreaded feeling when your brain goes blank, where you stop in mid-sentence and the words don't come. Or you don't remember where you just put your keys.

Or you're a writer and all creative thoughts and ideas cease to exist for a spell. What IS this? It is sometimes defined as brain fatigue, brain fog, overworked brain, brain drain, brain freeze, or writer's block.

From a medical point of view, if blank brain is accompanied by neurological and physiological symptoms, it may warrant an evaluation for a diagnosis of anxiety disorder, depression, or other physical illness.

But for most people, it's an irritating phenomenon that temporarily interrupts us from doing what needs to get done.

We anxiously wonder whether we're developing early dementia.

It can cause:

a) public embarrassment,

b) humiliation in front of audiences,

c) increased self-consciousness and self-doubt, and

d) a decreased sense of self-worth about our ability to produce at will.

We even think that our peers and colleagues will judge us or question our intelligence because we're not quick-witted or articulate enough. We fear that our professional reputations are at risk and will suffer. Simply put, we end up feeling like we don't measure up.

The Human Brain

Frozen or foggy brain draws a blank and renders a person speechless.
Frozen or foggy brain draws a blank and renders a person speechless. | Source

Fears About Our Brains Going Blank

What is your greatest fear about your brain not working?

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Our Pens Stop Writing When Our Brains Freeze

Blank brain interrupts creative flow, preventing retrieval, recall and our ability to express.
Blank brain interrupts creative flow, preventing retrieval, recall and our ability to express. | Source

Five Practical Steps to Taking Control and Combating Blank Brain

In order to combat blank brain, five critical areas need to be addressed. Being proactive can help decrease the fears, frustration, and lack of control this phenomenon can cause.

These steps are offered based solely on years of experience counseling clients who deal with high levels of exposure to stress and performance anxiety.

STEP ONE: Understand How the Brain Works

  • Accept that the brain at times can go on overload and needs a break; even computers crash so why not the complex human brain.
  • The brain has the capacity to store an infinite amount of information but cannot always retrieve it immediately.
  • Short-term memory, long-term memory, and attentiveness determine your ability to retain, recall, and retrieve information; it's not your fault.

STEP TWO: Don't Take Yourself So Seriously

  • Re-adjust your expectations about producing; temporarily reset your goals.
  • Laugh at yourself when you fumble or forget what to say; play it off with a confident demeanor and move on.
  • Read a sample of your favorite work or view a video of your best presentation to remind yourself how productive you have been and can be again; you are the same person with the same skills.

STEP THREE: Use Specific Techniques to Assist You

  • Learn deep breathing exercises; incoporate them into your life as a way to stabilize and maintain a sense of inner calm; at the moment of blank brain, take a long, deep breath, relax, collect your thoughts, and allow your memory to do it's job before anxiety sets in.
  • Do not take information in passively; be alert and attentive to the information you want to retain, remember, and retrieve later; pay attention to external cues, make them meaningful to you; let your awareness of information around you feed your ideas.
  • Keep written notes and ideas on 3 x 5 cards; have them handy for presentations in case you draw a blank; for writers, use the same technique to jot down ideas that you can refer back to and expand upon when you're having a dry spell. Create an idea bank.

We Can't Produce When Our Brains Lock

Blank brain halts production from the keyboard.
Blank brain halts production from the keyboard. | Source

Blank Brain Produces Empty Pages and Blank Screens

Empty pages of a notebook is a metaphor for the creative brain going blank.
Empty pages of a notebook is a metaphor for the creative brain going blank. | Source

STEP FOUR: Know Your Stuff

  • If you familiarize yourself with your topic, know what you're talking about, do your research, and strive to become an expert, you are less likely to flub or go blank. Develop a niche.
  • Expand your experiences and social circles to increase exposure to more encounters from which you can draw more ideas. Sitting at home without regular social interaction and involvement will not lend itself to fresh ideas coming into your head.
  • Learn something new that you're not necessarily interested in and either speak about it or write about it. You may discover something new and unexpected that will stimulate new ways of thinking outside the box. Use a thesaurus for new words and phrasings to change up your speaking or writing flavor.

STEP FIVE: Know Yourself

  • Be aware and honest with yourself about personal issues, losses, elevated stress levels, or unresolved traumas that might be getting in the way of your capacity to function optimally. Self-care, breaks, regular support, and healthy outlets are necessary for sustained productivity and performance.
  • Recurring panic attacks, sleep problems, changes in appetite, dizziness, headaches, poor concentration and memory, fatigue, negative self-talk, and feeling overwhelmed and depressed are signs that you might need assistance. If these symptoms persist, worsen, or prevent daily functioning at home and at work for a significant duration (six months or more for anxiety, 2 weeks or more for depression -Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders), consider a medical or neurological evaluation to rule out any medical conditions.

Cure Your Blank Brain with Knowledge and Prevention

In our society where productivity and performance define our self-worth, blank brain can take a toll on our ability to live up to our professional and personal expectations.

It is imperative for us to realize that we cannot continue to push ourselves into overdrive without a cost to our well-being.

We have more control than we think we do by taking preventative steps to combat blank brain. Taking better care of ourselves will increase our ability to produce good work on a consistent basis.

Symptoms and Cures for Brain Fog Related to Fibromyalgia

© 2012 Janis Leslie Evans

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    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 2 weeks ago from Washington, DC

      Whatever you choose to do with the rest of your life, sounds like you could benefit from talking it out with counselor. I wish you the best with your family.

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      sunituls@gmail.com 2 weeks ago

      Got married at 20. Today 50. Always blamed for ego attitude being loud, extrovert. Loser in all years. Still laughed to the best. Today broken. Nobody as family friends or known. Alofe with husband who is innocent guy with simplicity. Son over enthusiastic but busy with his own thoughts. Do not know what to do the rest life.

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 3 weeks ago from Washington, DC

      Memory issues as adults age is expected. If she has concerns she should talk with her doctor.

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 3 weeks ago from Washington, DC

      You're welcome, Tiffany. Thanks for reading.

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      Farnoosh 3 weeks ago

      Hi

      My grandma is 72

      Sometime's her mind goes blank

      For example plenty of time she says "year" instead of "day"

      Or something like this..

      I wanna make her get better but i don't know what should i do !

      Can you please help meee

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      Tiffany 3 weeks ago

      Excellent article. Thank you Janis for the insight!

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 3 weeks ago from Washington, DC

      Sounds like you could benefit from a thorough evaluation by a medical doctor or neural psychologist to see what recommends for treatment they can offer. I wish you well.

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 5 weeks ago from Washington, DC

      Clement, have you talked to a therapist or seen a psychologist for an evaluation? It may be helpful to start with your doctor for a recommendation on whether counseling for anxiety and depression or a neurological evaluation could rule out any problems. Thank you for reading, I wish you the best.

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      Clement babantah 5 weeks ago

      12years ago I was admitted to study Electrical Electronic Engineering in higher institution,within a week I began to experience hotness and serious movement in my brain which lead to discontinuation of the programme and uptil now I have not achieve anything in life,i have being moving from one point to other looking for solution to my problem.pls what would I do

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 8 weeks ago from Washington, DC

      Sounds like you could definitely benefit from addressing your anxiety and practicing relaxation techniques. A good therapist can help. I wish you the best.

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      Claraf 8 weeks ago

      I used to have a brilliant memory but now I don't remember what I said or what others told me. Also, my mind goes blank most of the time when I'm under pressure or talking with colleagues in a meeting. I can't focus when I read or listen to someone when they are talking. I'm always anxious and my heartbeat accelerates. I feel really frustrated.

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 3 months ago from Washington, DC

      Cameron, I've never heard of this but I'm glad it appears to be under control. Maybe a thorough neurological assessment by a doctor would be in order. I would also explore what stressful events were/are going on at the time an episodes hits. My first guess is that it's anxiety related. I wish you the best.

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      Cameron 3 months ago

      Not sure how to word this. Every once in a while I will be doing something and my mind goes blank, and all I see is black (if this makes sense.)

      This happened during my sophomore year. I would be walking through the halls after Geometry class and my my mind went blank nearly everyday, i saw all black, and when I was able to see things again I began to wonder simple things such as: my name, the time, date, where I work, income, etc.

      Though this was very frequent 4 years ago, this only happens once every few months now if even. I'm wondering if anyone else has experienced this that knows their trigger. Also wondering how normal this is.

      Thanks!

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      Janis Leslie Evans 3 months ago from Washington, DC

      Thank you, Adam, for your inquiry. I'm glad the article resonated with you. I suggest you get referrals from your doctors and follow through with any suggestions they may offer for more testing, perhaps a neurological exam and/or counseling. I wish you well, Adam.

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      Janis Leslie Evans 4 months ago from Washington, DC

      Absolutely, very common among many. Thanks for stopping by and reading.

    • Harmel profile image

      Melody Gibbons 4 months ago from Staff Ave Cochranton Pa 16314

      Very informative. It's good to know that you are not alone.

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 4 months ago from Washington, DC

      Hi Sagar, it is clear you have a lot of symptoms that need medical evaluation, treatment, and monitoring. I suggest you make an appointment with an experienced, qualified doctor who specializes in anxiety. You've taken a huge first step in educating yourself about your symptoms. Thank you for taking the time to read this article. I hope it was informative.

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      Sagar 4 months ago

      Hi Janis,

      I am Sagar from. I am suffering from Recurring panic attacks, sleep problems, changes in appetite, dizziness, headaches, poor concentration and memory, fatigue, negative self-talk, and feeling overwhelmed and depressed from 3 years.

      Bellow are the few symptoms I have noted by observing myself -

      1) Feeling heavy head and tired through out the day.

      2) I wake up each morning completely zombie-mode and that feeling would remain throughout the entirety of my day

      3) I feel as though I had no control over myself. I loose drive and motivation. I loose a lot of confidence.

      4) I feel a constant irritation in my head....like pressure almost.

      5) Mind always in racing condition - what ever i am trying to tell or write that overlap.

      6) I easily get confused what to say what to do ... Like confuse to say yesterday or tomorrow, he and she ...

      7) I get panic easily.. if someone ask something i get panic even though i know that and my mind get exhausted and i cant able to reply properly.

      8) I easily get frustrated .. Example - Lets say i am reading somthing . After reading 4 to 5 lines i get irritate and move to next line .. then next and end of the chapter. Loosing of patience.

      9 ) I am not able to recall things even though i know things. Like i cant remember names , words , for which i cant able to complete sentence.

      10) I cant get sleep easily. But feeling sleepy mood always.

      11) I can’t concentrate on anything. Always something is going on mind, even though i try to stop thinking and concentrate on one thing but i never able to concentrate on one thing. Example - I just search for doctor for anxiety problem, simultenuiously my mind is thinking what i will say there, is it able to care, will the doctor cheat me.

      12) Feelings of panic, fear, and uneasiness

      13) Muscle tension near leg

      14) Feeling excessive stress on mind.

      Please help me out to come out from this....

      Thanks,

      Sagar

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 7 months ago from Washington, DC

      Sounds like you should consider a medical evaluation to see if you need treatment and counseling. Thanks for reading this article.

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 7 months ago from Washington, DC

      You are very welcome, Mary Ann. Glad you found it helpful, thanks for taking the time to read it and leave a comment.

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      Mary Ann Benson 7 months ago

      This makes sense. I had a stroke, and this is what happened to my brain for about 3 months. Then it slowly came back. That was in 2008. Still working on it. But when I am under a lot of stress, and stressors. My mind goes blank. It just shuts down, and feels hallow on the inside. I can function, eat, drink, walk, and talk. But don't ask me questions, yell at me, as I won't have an answer for you. When in this mode. My brain is telling me, it is taking a break from all the incoming information, and that it needs a rest. Next day, is like it never happened. I felt like a walking wall. Absorb nothing, and leave nothing. Brain resting, do not disturb. Not foggy. Although I do know what that is too. Most times its cause I don't drink enough water. Very good article. Glad I found it. Thank you.

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 8 months ago from Washington, DC

      Thank you for sharing this information, Li. I appreciate your visit and comment.

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      Li 8 months ago

      I remember this feeling quite alot before i realized the truth about the really dangerous fluoride in our water and i would urge anyone to look into how powerful the effects this chemical as on the brain especially the pineal gland. Research the pineal gland and how to quickly de-calcify it. very important you do this,very important to understand whats going on an to clear the fog.Check out "what is fluoride doing to my brain" also "what is my Pineal Gland and its uses" and " The ways to detox from fluoride" all video's that are easy to understand and interesting, i found that the video's motivated me when i understood more about the third eye or "the seat of the soul" dont be put off by ancient explanations, its basically just explaining how you see things with your imagination through the pineal gland, you cannot see without an eye.Please dont let my explanation put you off.Ive never had such a rapid awakening from brain fog.This techniuqe was used by the nazi's in the camps, they put fluoride in the water to dumb down the prisoners so they would act docile thus giving them no trouble.

      I sincerely hope i atleast one person will go and learn what ive advised, it is very easy to watch small video clips with doctors and scientists telling you whats been happening to you under through the water supply. Please look. ive nothing to gain apart from bettering my fellow men/women.

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 9 months ago from Washington, DC

      Anxiety certainly can make you feel helpless as if nothing can get better. I hope you can find some help, maybe an evaluation by a doctor who can recommend alternative treatments to give you some relief. I wish you well. Thank you for taking the time to read this article.

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      Mohammad 9 months ago

      Thanks for those good tips but I don't think they can help me! most of the time when I want to explain something to someone, I can't remember it even if it seems so easy, sometimes all of it,sometimes parts of it . I know my severe anxiety causes that,when I begin to talk to people and I'm so helpless. Unfortunately , my problem is getting worse everyday and even when I'm at home and nobody's there, suddenly I begin to feel so nervous something like panic attack especially when I want to remember something or review something for myself and I know it's because of those bad experiences I had in front of people. I feel I'm losing my mind, it's a very awful experience. I ask myself how can I find a job with this terrible mind, with this damn anxiety? How can I have a normal life? Just God can help me!

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 11 months ago from Washington, DC

      It's good to know you found this article useful and that it touched you in such a profound way. Glad to be of help. Take good care.

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      arun 11 months ago

      thank you, that was very useful, got me tears in my eyes as some parts talked about exactly what i am going through right now.

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 12 months ago from Washington, DC

      Excellent, Marlene. Glad to know this was helpful. My brain is getting worse with age. :) Thanks for stopping by.

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      Marlene Bertrand 12 months ago from Northern California, USA

      My blank brain tends to occur when I am caught in a situation where I have to stand up and speak, like, when I visit a new church and the pastor calls on me to stand up and introduce myself. I have been known to forget my own name! It's embarrassing. I feel better knowing I am not alone. Thank you for clearing up a few things and for giving tips for helping solve this issue. One thing I do is keep a notepad with me at all times.

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 14 months ago from Washington, DC

      The only thorough way to know what might be going on is to talk to your doctor, share your symptoms and see if a neurological exam is needed.

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      Linda 14 months ago

      I get brain fog quite often but usually when I'm asked a question, I will become hot, sweaty and cannot think of the answer to a simple question like who is the Vice President ? It will take several minutes for the answer to come to me. Or I will read something and cannot remember what I just read . I'm very worried . What is this?

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 15 months ago from Washington, DC

      Not sure what that may be so I cannot answer your specific question. If a child is having frequent blank brain, that needs to be assessed by a pediatrician. Thanks for reading and for the question.

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      Shazzia 15 months ago

      Hi my son is 6 n he has started getting blank like10 to 12 times a day. Will this effect him in future will he be able to drive cars what should I do to stop this

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 23 months ago from Washington, DC

      It's very common for probably millions of people every day, AshlyChristen, even without a diagnosis. It happens to me daily. It would happen a lot between me and my sister during phone conversations. We'd just laugh it off. Thanks for stopping by.

    • AshlyChristen profile image

      Ashly Christen 23 months ago from Illinois

      this happens to me and my sister all the time! It really is an inconvenience. She does have fibromyalsia but i do not.

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 2 years ago from Washington, DC

      You're very welcome, Rabadi. It happens to me several times a day, lol! Thank you for your visit.

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      2 years ago from New York

      Happens to the best of us lol thank you for this interesting article!

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 2 years ago from Washington, DC

      I hope you find it helpful, ThatMommyBlogger. You've been through a lot. I wish you the best.

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      Missy 2 years ago from The Midwest

      I'm bookmarking this. I have post-concussion syndrome and deal with ongoing memory problems. They used to be severe, but they're getting much better. It's been almost 2 years since my brain injury, though. Things were terrible at first.

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 2 years ago from Washington, DC

      I appreciate that, word55. But I do all of that and still have brain lapses, lol. I think it comes with too much multi-tasking and age! Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

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      Word 2 years ago from Chicago

      Thanks jan, when you are very active, having multiple duties and responsibilities in life it would seem extremely difficult to have a brain lapse as long as proper rest is gotten and healthy eating is applied as well as having a closer relationship with Father, God!

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 2 years ago from Washington, DC

      Thank you.

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      Bob 2 years ago

      If your brain is empty try storing this it might help I have the same issue but mine is blank because I reach to a point when all I think are this things and it has solve my problems and worries 1 love peace and family 2 is past present and future 3 trust believe and have faith 4 truth acceptance and choice 5 Soul heart and mind 6 Forgive help and give 7 is the Father the Son and the Holy Spirit 8 is reality belief and change. And the four pillars of the cube positivity pray hope and strength. Memorize it and it's yours

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      Janis Leslie Evans 2 years ago from Washington, DC

      You're welcome, Courtney. Thnanks for stopping by and taking the time to read it. Glad you found it helpful.

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      Courtney Rhodes 2 years ago from Houston, Texas U.S.A.

      Thanks for sharing, I always seem to have nothing to say in a conversation, especially the surprise kind, but I am good at talking in front of a large group, which I dont often get to do. i found your hub comforting,

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 2 years ago from Washington, DC

      You are right about how not paying attention can be a factor. Thank you for taking the time to read this one. Glad you liked it, agvulpes.

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      Peter 2 years ago from Australia

      Wow great information in this Hub I have experienced Brain Fog/Fade many times and mostly through not 'paying attention' :)

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 3 years ago from Washington, DC

      Thanks for taking the time to read it, hope it helps with the anxiety.

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      Marvin Parke 3 years ago from Jamaica

      This is a great article. I have never thought of it before. My experience with brain fog may due to anxiety or panic. I will try your solution anyway.

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      Christian Mike Simmons 3 years ago from Durham, NC

      You are welcome. I wish you the best on your next Hub

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      Janis Leslie Evans 3 years ago from Washington, DC

      Thank you very much for taking the time to read it. I appreciate the comment and visit. Hope it helps when you need it. Thanks for the follow and fanmail.

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      Christian Mike Simmons 3 years ago from Durham, NC

      Good article. Worth considering next time the "fog" appears,

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      tompublicspeaking 3 years ago

      Glad I found this Hub, there is some really great tips on here. I have been writing about how I cured my Fear of Public Speaking over on my blog at http://curefearofpublicspeaking.com/ , I hope it helps some of you!

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      Melody Gibbons 3 years ago from Staff Ave Cochranton Pa 16314

      thank you very much

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 3 years ago from Washington, DC

      Glad you found this hub useful, Harmel. Thank you for the visit. I'm glad I could be of help, my pleasure, anytime.

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      Melody Gibbons 3 years ago from Staff Ave Cochranton Pa 16314

      How interesting that you are writing on this topic. I am in therapy right now due to losing my memory. or even my mind. .I am working using DPT with a counselor but I had to go look to see what it was called because I forgot. I was afraid to try writing again due to the fact I have forgot a lot of grammar and spelling , thank you spellcheck. But most of all thank you janshares for helping me more than once on the same day.

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      Janis Leslie Evans 3 years ago from Washington, DC

      Thanks for reading and leaving a great comment, pstraubie48. I'm glad that it's helping so many people. Bless you.

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 3 years ago from sunny Florida

      Hi This is so well done, Jan. This does happen to most of us at some point. Knowing how to 'back up and regroup' or to prevent it from happening to begin with can be of such a great help. Thanks for taking the time to share this information with us.

      Angels are on the way to you ps

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 3 years ago from Washington, DC

      I suggest breathing techniques to help you relax. But if it's been going on for that long, I recommend talking to a counselor or even a doctor. I don't think you're crazy, just stressed out. I wish you luck and peace.

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      Lance 3 years ago

      well i experienced this for the past few months like 4 or 5 what should i do? i don't know what to do? when i explain it to my parents they just laugh at me and say i'm crazy or something , so i didn't know what to do now. I can't imagine write good stories or even my math problems like i used to. When i think my head hurts, When i think it's all black please help me. am i going crazy or what

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 3 years ago from Washington, DC

      I think you're referring to two different things, nacy. Sounds like your brain goes blank to avoid thinking of the worst, e.g., death of loved ones. Your brain going "blank" at those times is how you cope with fear. On the other hand going "blank" with intention is a great way to empty your mind to cleanse and open to positive thoughts as you meditate. Try having a blank mind with intent, not to avoid fear or anxiety. Replace those racing thoughts with the sound of your breath as you breathe deeply. If things don't improve, see your doctor for an evaluation for more intervention. Thank you for reading this article. I appreciate it.

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      Nacy 3 years ago

      I find myself with anxiety and something fear if death/etc of love ones and my brain goes blank. Usually when I mediate but then I get scare because my brain is always thinking. What can I do to teach myself that it is ok to have a blank mind and not to panic. I should enjoy these moment of no brain activity?

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 3 years ago from Washington, DC

      Try to practice deep breathing. When you slow down your breathing, you slow down your brain. Make you breaths long, slow, fine, and deep. You may be on brain overload due to stress and anxiety. Check with your doctor for medical advice and alternatives. I hope this helps.

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      C.j 3 years ago

      How can you learn new things when your brain just doesn't take in information? Even watching tv feels like my mind can't keep up.

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 4 years ago from Washington, DC

      Thanks so much for those comments, brakel2. I'm happy this hub resonated with you. I'm glad you came by. :-)

    • brakel2 profile image

      Audrey Selig 4 years ago from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

      Hi Jan - You are so right about brain drain. If our brain becomes overloaded, the brain drain you talk about occurs. The steps you mentioned are important. I enjoyed this hub so much, my husband and I step into brain drain and then try to get out of it. When I forget someone's name, it comes to me in a few minutes. In the meantime, if I relax it helps. I told my little granddaughter one day I was having brain drain, and she laughed. I asked her if she ever has that, and she said "in school." We all have it. Thank you so much for sharing your expertise. I will try the methods you suggested.

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      Janis Leslie Evans 4 years ago from Washington, DC

      Norin, thanks for the laugh. I think you handled that very well. Humor helps as you laugh at yourself. Thank you for stopping by and relating to this article.

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      Norin 4 years ago

      I faces this problem quite often. Once while giving a presentation on livestock to senior management , I got completely blank and forgot the word 'bull' but within seconds when I realised every one was looking I just used 'husband of buffaloe' and every one in the room burst into laughter. Oh I can't forget the embarrassment..

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      Janis Leslie Evans 4 years ago from Washington, DC

      You are quite welcome, Willsummerdreamer. I'm so glad you found it now and can still use the advice. I appreciate your stopping by and I'm especially grateful for the votes and sharing. Thank you much.

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      Will English. 4 years ago from Marietta, Georgia.

      Wish they had this advice when I was in school. I have ADHD and this happens to me all the darn time, so this sort of advice is invaluable. Thanks for writing it ^_^. *voted up and shared*.

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      Maree Michael Martin 4 years ago from Northwest Washington on an Island

      Yes, our brains and bodies do cry out for adequate rest and relaxation. Thanks for such wonderful tips to keep our thinking in top notch shape. Foggy brainers, unite! Great hub, thumbs up and shared.

    • janshares profile image
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      Janis Leslie Evans 4 years ago from Washington, DC

      Thanks so much, brakel2, glad you liked it. I appreciate that comment. I truly hope it helps someone.

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      Audrey Selig 4 years ago from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

      Great hub on brain fog. Your suggestions are right on target. The breathing especially works well in getting the oxygen to the brain, as you mentioned. I know your article will help others with problem solving.

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      Janis Leslie Evans 4 years ago from Washington, DC

      Hi HoneyBB, so glad u found this hub helpful. You know, I'm feeling the same way, forgetting and neglecting things since addiction to hubpages. It kinda creeps up on you. Thanks for stopping by and reading this hub. A lot of people can relate to this.

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      Honey Halley 4 years ago from Illinois

      Great hub Jan, Voted +++ I have been experiencing this brain fog a lot more often lately. I think it's because I'm addicted to HubPages and I rarely ever sleep. LOL! Thanks for giving be some sound advice to unload my overloaded brain. I appreciate you spending your time to put this info out here.

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      Janis Leslie Evans 4 years ago from Washington, DC

      It does feel that way sometimes as we get older but it is mostly stress. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

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      Pamela Lipscomb 4 years ago from Charlotte, North Carolina

      It is good to know you're not going senile, of you become forgetful. There is a lot of stress in the world. We have to learn how to be still and recover. Great topic!

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      Janis Leslie Evans 4 years ago from Washington, DC

      You're welcome, kittykfree. Thanks for stopping by and reading it. Glad you liked it.

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      Kitty K. Free 4 years ago

      These are some great tips. Thanks for sharing!

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      Janis Leslie Evans 4 years ago from Washington, DC

      Ha ha, yes, innerspin. So glad you related to this hub, as we all do. Thank you for stopping by, reading, and leaving a great comment.

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      innerspin 4 years ago from uk

      " Foggy" should be my middle name, I'm an expert in going blank! You make very good suggestions. Sometimes you do have to laugh at yourself. It's easy to become overly self-conscious and think you're the only person this happens to, but the majority of people flounder at times. Interesting hub, thanks.

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      Janis Leslie Evans 5 years ago from Washington, DC

      Wow, thanks, Rajan. I soooooo much appreciate your comments and your support. I hope it will get lots of traffic. I'm a newbie and looking forward to traffic increases soon.

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      Rajan Singh Jolly 5 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Wonderful pointers. Sometimes e do worry about this too much. Even our brain needs to pause for a breath seemingly, unless of course it is serious and requires medical investigation.

      Sharing this on G+1.

      Voting it up, useful and interesting.

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      Janis Leslie Evans 5 years ago from Washington, DC

      Thanks, Om. I appreciate the comment. It happened to me as I was writing the hub, ha ha ha. I couldn't think of the word "Disclaimer" that I wanted to add since I was talking about health issues without any medical background or references. I think I covered it ok without actually using the word.

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      Om Paramapoonya 5 years ago

      Haha I actually just experienced this yesterday. I was talking to my husband and I couldn't think of the word "endorse", a simple two-syllable word. It finally came to me after about a minute. How weird. Nice hub, by the way. Rated up and useful!

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      Janis Leslie Evans 5 years ago from Washington, DC

      Thanks, Dan. I appreciate that.

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      Dan Barfield 5 years ago from Gloucestershire, England, UK

      Useful and Interesting, voted up! Great stuff!