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10 Tips for Bullet Journaling

Updated on June 27, 2017
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Introduction

There are a million videos, websites, and tutorials about starting and maintaining a bullet journal. Essentially, there is a basic guideline to follow, and after that, it’s on you to personalize it and make it your own. I started a bullet journal earlier this year, and it has been enormously helpful in keeping me organized in that old school, hipster way that I love and helps me to avoid sticking Post-It notes to every surface I own. However, there are some design choices that I have tweaked or plan to tweak with my next journal. Here are 10 tips that I came up with for anyone who has or is thinking of starting a bullet journal.

Make sure you have a place to keep your pen.
Make sure you have a place to keep your pen. | Source
Index - could be condensed or omitted altogether.
Index - could be condensed or omitted altogether. | Source
Monthly page.
Monthly page. | Source
Weekly page.
Weekly page. | Source
Collections
Collections | Source
Sharpies will bleed through most pages.
Sharpies will bleed through most pages. | Source

Tips

Type of Journal

My first bullet journal was a tightly bound, hard cover, 5x7 notebook. I think this is the perfect size. However, I would opt for a spiral-bound notebook so that you have a place to store your pen. My pen is always lodged into the page that I’m on and slides out whenever I pick it up and move it.


The Key Isn’t Needed After the First Week

Bullet journals use special symbols to keep track of events and organize tasks. This is the first page that you create in your journal. Not only does it fill up the easiest page to get to, but you can memorize the symbols in a matter of seconds or even make your own. So, creating a key that explains to you what every symbol means is useless. After all, this generally for your use only. No one else is going to need to study it later to understand its meaning. Most tasks and events are self-explanatory, and their symbols are very familiar. So, there is no need to waste space with this page. It won’t be going into my next journal.


The Index

The Index section makes numbering your pages worthwhile and helps you to locate specific pages easily. However, it’s not a section that I use often. Normally, I keep my journal on the most current page that I am on and don’t really refer to previous pages very often. So, I don’t think I’ll be so meticulous about indexing every single page of the journal, only the important pages that I will need to refer to later. The weekly pages for each month can be grouped together, and specific information should be referenced more specifically, such as my “things to buy” list, which is a page that I’m always altering and need to get to often.

Collections

Most of the bullet journal tutorials that I watched before starting mine said to create two pages titled “Collections” after each month. However, I think I’ll make collections its own section in the front of my next bullet journal and dedicate a large number of pages to it. I like the thought of keeping all of my lists together instead of sorting through each month’s to find the one list I’m looking for.

Make Your Monthly Pages in Advance

This is just personal preference of course, but in my opinion, a bullet journal is supposed to keep you organized and on track, not suck up your free time designing and decorating it each week. So, I always make my pages a month in advance. My journal isn’t intricately designed, but I do like to set aside time to make it neat and a bit colorful. It’s a nice opportunity to have a task that is both organized and artistic, and it keeps me from feeling rushed to plot out the next week’s charts as the current week comes to an end.


The “ >” Symbol Isn’t Helpful

Besides the bullets, the basic rules of the symbols are meant to mark tasks as either complete, cancelled, or postponed. The “>” symbol is most commonly used for postponed tasks. Then, you can move the task to another day or month. The purpose is to track which tasks you are putting off and figuring out if it really needs to be done if it keeps getting postponed. This is not helpful. If I want to postpone a task now, I just cross it off and then move it to the next available day. The symbol around the bullet is distracting, and I don’t find myself scrolling through past pages to see what I’ve been putting off (believe me, I know what I’m putting off). So, if you are a forward thinker, this symbol is not for you.


Overlap the Months on Your Weekly Calendar

The largest chunk of your journal is going to be your weekly tasks. These are labeled by the day of the week and date. However, most months do not end on the last day of the week. So, you have to decide whether to let the new month overlap onto that week’s page or to start a new page starting on the first day of the month. I prefer the former. So, if the month of January ends on a Wednesday, I finish plotting out that week with February 1st, 2nd, and 3rd. I feel like it’s more important to see the whole week ahead of you than worry about February events bleeding through in your January section.


Don’t Use Markers That Bleed Through Your Pages

Making your bullet journal pop can most easily be used with markers. I bust out every Sharpie I own when I make my new pages and come up with a different color scheme and font design for each month. However, Sharpies bleed through my pages, and they can overlap the designs you make on back-to-back pages. So, I would stick with colored pencils, or buy a journal with very thick paper to avoid this.


Leave Room for Extra Tasks Each Week

Sometimes there are tasks that you want to do on a particular week, but you’re not sure what day you’re going to do them yet (ex. I might want to wash my car one day of a particular week, but I don’t know which day my schedule and the weather will allow me to do this). I started to write these tasks down in the header of my weekly page and cross them off as if they were completed throughout the week. However, I started to devote the extra space on the second page of my weekly schedule (where usually just Friday, Saturday, and Sunday tasks would go) to a space beneath Sunday as an “other” day. I can then move them up into a particular day as I plot out the week or just “x” them out as they are completed.


Don’t Carry It Around With You

Now, this seems to defeat the purpose of keeping a bullet journal, but there are already so many things that we carry around with us all the time: phones, purses, wallets, etc. I prefer to leave my journal in my bedroom and whenever I want to add or subtract to it, I go to the journal. If I’m not home, I scribble it down on a piece of paper and take it home to pencil into my journal later. Even though I mainly use it as a planner and am not writing private thoughts into my bullet journal like some people do (which is fine and even encouraged in most tutorials), I take the title of “journal” very seriously and feel that it is not something that I should carry around with me. Having it in one place allows me to devote my full attention to it when I do work on it.

Do you own a bullet journal? Share your tips and tricks below!

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