Clash of the Worlds—Chapter Four

Updated on November 29, 2017

The Question Asked

The meal finished that Sunday afternoon at Grammy's house, all re-gather in the living room near Grammy's wingback chair. Timothy and Jessi position themselves on the ottoman, their favorite spot when together in Grammy's house. That "favorite dessert," as Jessi had mentioned, is served. While munching down on that ice cream and pecan pie, Timothy then asked Pastor Jacobs his question he had asked Grammy the other day, "Is there really a Christmas?"

Jessi fixed her gaze on her friend and listened as Timothy shares with the pastor what he was learning in school, or not learning, about Christmas.

The hearing of it wrinkles Pastor Jacobs' brow. Silence pierces the room momentarily as the pastor ponders the question. Both the children, poised on the edge of the ottoman, eyes fixed on the pastor, waits for his reply.

The Question Answered

Taking a deep breath, the pastor then speaks, his attention toward the children. "Timothy, your teacher and those like her are wrong. The age of 'political correctness' has corrupted their reasoning. Hmm, how can I put it?"

He paused, then continuing. "Ah, simply put, children, that means we must watch the very words we speak, write, or even think, so as not to upset or offend, anybody," he paused again.

"And that idea" he continued, "suggests to me that we shouldn't be negative about anything. All is good, as some want to believe (and want us to believe) even if it's wrong. But a sin is a sin, right?" (The children nodded yes, turning toward each other, and then back to the pastor.) "A lie is a lie; bad is not good," the pastor continued. "No matter what we call something or someone, it still is what it is. We still are what we are. Only because of our God – the Almighty Three-in-One Creator – who loves us all so very much, we are able to change our status.

"But, Timothy, Jessi," the pastor went on, "to refer to Christmas simply as a ‘holiday,'" he said, "is going way too far in my thinking. Christmas not a part of culture! Let me tell you, children, Christmas is much more a part of culture than anything else your teacher or anyone else may want to throw at you.

"Yes, children, there is a Christmas, and it's all about Jesus, as you two know oh so well at your tender age. He exists as certainly as love and generosity and devotion exist, and you know that they abound and give to your life its highest beauty and joy. They exist because they are a part of Jesus, who brought it all into being. How dark this world would be if there was no Christmas! It would be as dreary as if there were no Timothys, or Jessis," the pastor said, smiling at the children. "Not believe in Christmas," he continued, "you might as well not believe in life.

"It was God who started it all, perfectly. He became one of us on Christmas day, in the person of Jesus. Through Jesus' birth, life, death, and resurrection, we have a real status symbol."

"Jesus died for His friends," Jessi said. "Is that right, Pastor Jacobs?"

"Yes, that's exactly right. I guess you could say His sacrifice for us was the 'ultimate Christmas gift.' He died for His friends – of His day and for all time, for you and me..."

"For Timothy, too," Jessi interrupted. Eyeing each person, she continued, "And Mommy and Daddy, and Grammy; and Mrs. Jacobs, and Ronny and Rebecca."

"Yes, that's it," responded Pastor Jacobs. "Jesus died for all. No Christmas! No Jesus! Thank God! Jesus lives and lives forever. For a thousand years from now, children – nay, for all eternity. Those who accept God's gift of life become His children. They will have the continual joy of Christmas the whole year through. And 'Merry Christmas,' then, is understood and appreciated."


("Ugh, Christmas!" that evil one aspiring a hateful glare remarks. "How dreadful," he concludes. "But the end of it is coming," he continually plotting his evil schemes to dispense with any display of Christmas upon Earth, as commissioned by his leader.)


Go to Chapter Five

© 2017 Charles Newcombe

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