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The Little Indian Boy Learned About Home While Sitting on His Grandfather's Knee

My name is Ruby, and I live in southern Il. I love to write rhyme, poetry, and fiction.

the-little-indian-boy-learned-about-home-while-sitting-on-his-grandfathers-knee

He often wondered about life beyond the casino infestation

Once upon a time there was a little Indian boy who lived on an allotted reservation

He often wondered about life in the world beyond the casino infestation?

His grandfather sat him on his knee and told him how it used to be

A proud family tradition, dignity and the best was living free

Then one day soldiers came and took their land away

They were forced to travel many miles where they still live today

It was a strange land and it has never felt like home

No hunting buffalo, no river to catch fish and no place to roam

History called it ' The Trail Of Tears '

Babies born, snow falling, many dying, old women still remembers after all these years

When they finally reached their destination

They thought of home and their peaceful cohabitation

Now we read that the young and old drink liquor just to survive

The women work in the casinos or the hotels that house the gamblers who grow wealthy after they arrive

The little Indian boy listened closely while sitting on his grandfather's knee

Wishing for his homeland, but mostly wishing his grandpa could have restful memories.




the-little-indian-boy-learned-about-home-while-sitting-on-his-grandfathers-knee

Comments

Ruby Jean Richert (author) from Southern Illinois on May 09, 2019:

Yes Manatita. I think every country probably has something they would like to do over again. and yes, love is the key. Thank you..

manatita44 from london on May 09, 2019:

Yes. A lot of history is very sad, but yes, those problems can be found everywhere. Let us carry on the best we can. Much Love.

Ruby Jean Richert (author) from Southern Illinois on May 09, 2019:

Hello Manatita, I have always felt closeness with the Indian population, my father's mother was one half Indian. We should never forget what America did through greed. Thank you..

manatita44 from london on May 08, 2019:

Short and concise history. but enough to ponder on.

Brings back memories. Good on ya!

Ruby Jean Richert (author) from Southern Illinois on April 09, 2019:

Hello Peggy. So nice to see you. Thank you for reading and leaving a generous comment. Hopefully we will learn and never repeat this act of greed.

Peggy Woods from Houston, Texas on April 09, 2019:

Hi Ruby,

The Trail of Tears is a significant blemish on our nation's history that has had long-lasting effects. You did a good job capturing this with only a few words.

Ruby Jean Richert (author) from Southern Illinois on April 09, 2019:

Hello Shauna. I guess when you feel deeply about the subject it brings words of feeling. Thank you for feeling that...

Shauna L Bowling from Central Florida on April 08, 2019:

Such a sad reality, Ruby. You did a nice job of tackling the emotions felt so many generations down the line.

Ruby Jean Richert (author) from Southern Illinois on April 08, 2019:

Hello Pamela. If we stop writing or talking about the way the Indian population was cheated out of their land, we might forget, and that would be a shame. Thank you for coming to read and comment.

Pamela Oglesby from Sunny Florida on April 08, 2019:

The treatment of the Indians has always been abhorant. You wrote about all of these issues that occured over the years, and it is sad. Thank you Ruby for making us remember.

Ruby Jean Richert (author) from Southern Illinois on April 07, 2019:

Hello Dianna. I didn't know it was still going on, and in Florida? When will greed stop people from hurting other races? I am sorry to hear that. Thank you for telling me.

Ruby Jean Richert (author) from Southern Illinois on April 07, 2019:

Hello Genna. So nice to see you on my page. Your comment is my feelings exactly. Thank you for words of wisdom and truth. Hugs my friend.

Dianna Mendez on April 07, 2019:

We have this situation in south Florida. A truth often looked over due to the income it brings in.

Genna East from Massachusetts, USA on April 07, 2019:

This is stunning, Ruby. Our treatment of the American Indian was and still is devastating. We lost any moral superiority we could have hoped for by stealing and destroying their lands, their heritage and their environmental wisdom and spirituality. It truly is the 'Trail of Tears', and 'Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. Your muse speaks the truth with sadness and beauty. Thank you for this poem.

Ruby Jean Richert (author) from Southern Illinois on April 07, 2019:

Hello Mar. I read an article that told about alcohol abuse was ramped among the Indian population and was blamed on the forced move off their land many years ago. Thank you so much. Love always. Hugs

Ruby Jean Richert (author) from Southern Illinois on April 07, 2019:

Hello Verlie. It sounds like you are having a ball with the birds, esp. the crow. Hee. You should write about the crow, he's a blast. Thanks again.

Maria Jordan from Jeffersonville PA on April 07, 2019:

Dear Ruby,

Thanks to you and your muse for not allowing us to forget the catastrophic results and long-lasting effects of this tragic time in our history.

Have a peaceful day. Love and hugs, mar

Verlie Burroughs from Canada on April 06, 2019:

Haha, nope. I'm waay over on the West coast. But I've been to Ontario a couple of times...Thank you Ruby, hope you and your birds are getting some Spring weather. It was nice here, but turned cold again, wind, and rain. The birds don't seem to care. They keep coming around for feed, and the crows are using my yard as a hangout. Too funny. I saw a young crow doing acrobatics on the telephone line. He was hanging upside down by his toes like a bat. I thought maybe he was stuck, or hurt, but he flew away fine, and then came back and did it a few more times. I've never seen that before, made me laugh.

Ruby Jean Richert (author) from Southern Illinois on April 06, 2019:

Ray said, " Hi Verlie." He lived 30 miles south of Hamilton, Ontario, near Lake Erie, Maybe you were neighbors? Thanks again.

Verlie Burroughs from Canada on April 06, 2019:

Hey Ruby (I keep wanting to call you always :) No, I didn't know that. Hi Ray!

Ruby Jean Richert (author) from Southern Illinois on April 06, 2019:

Hello Linda, so nice to see you again. Yes, the pain is still felt today. I am glad we would never do that evil today. Greed has no boundaries. Thank you so much...

Linda Rogers from Minnesota on April 06, 2019:

Such sad history & the pain it caused. Thanks for writing this Ruby.

Ruby Jean Richert (author) from Southern Illinois on April 06, 2019:

Hello Verlie, good to see you. It is good that countries are still talking about the Indian problem. Did you know that my husband Ray is from Ontario Canada? Thanks for the info. I was not aware of this. Thank you for coming to read and comment.

Verlie Burroughs from Canada on April 06, 2019:

Ruby, your poem paints a grim picture, so much pain in this story. And one that runs deep in the history of the Americas, North, and South. In Canada there are still treaty talks going on, but many First Nations are not participating, because they don't trust the process, and for those who do participate, the process is slow. Meanwhile, it is the same, many aboriginal people (not all) live on poor land that is not their original territory, and their culture suffers as a result. However there are still many that are thriving, and working hard on saving their language and culture for future generations, which is heartwarming to see.

Good write!

Ruby Jean Richert (author) from Southern Illinois on April 06, 2019:

Hello Mike. We rhyme when we comment. I practically talk in rhyme. lol Thank you, I agree that it is an important subject. Cheers...PS is the carriage about ready to roll? Hugs.

Ruby Jean Richert (author) from Southern Illinois on April 06, 2019:

Hello Bill. I think anyone with a heart will agree. I hope the story is remembered and told, and never forgotten. Thank you.

Ruby Jean Richert (author) from Southern Illinois on April 06, 2019:

Hello again Eric. Your love and compassion for others, no matter the race, is beautiful and it is evident in all of your writing. Blessings my friend.

Ruby Jean Richert (author) from Southern Illinois on April 06, 2019:

Hello Clive I agree. When I lived in Missouri my son Jackie had an Indian friend and he told us that his family received a Gov. check monthly, so I guess all who was forced away from their land are being paid. Thank you for coming to read and comment.

mckbirdbks from Emerald Wells, Just off the crossroads,Texas on April 06, 2019:

Hello Ruby - Your muse was right to let you write, so beautifully, about such an important subject.

Bill Holland from Olympia, WA on April 06, 2019:

This is one of those truths, Ruby, I wish I could ignore....it is simply a sadness that will not go away.

Eric Dierker from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A. on April 06, 2019:

Ruby my life is so rich with Raymond Billygoats, Thurman Joshangava, Frank Donald and Beefy Lopez in it. So many more and so many "girlfriends". Too much here, please excuse me.

Clive Williams from Jamaica on April 05, 2019:

Sad reality the Indians faced. America owes them.

Ruby Jean Richert (author) from Southern Illinois on April 05, 2019:

Hi Eric. My grandmother on my father's side was 1\2 Indian, so that makes me part Indian. When I hear of the terrible way we took their land it makes me feel for them. I read an article that said the old and young were drinking liquor to forget the past. My muse finally agreed that I could write about it. Do call your friends. You're a good man and I am glad to call you friend. Thank you...

Eric Dierker from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A. on April 05, 2019:

I rotted in a nasty jungle for a few weeks. Felt like hell. I got nothing. My best friends growing up were from the Hopi and Navajo reservations. We were only told of hell by our parents. I reckon hell is passed down.

Thank you for reminding to call my buddies up near Kayenta and Tuba City way.