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Poetry: The Art of Languages and Beauty

poetry-the-art-of-languages

Poetry touches your soul each time you read it aloud to your significant other, or your twelve-year-old cat - wherever you are, whenever it is. Language and poetry go hand in hand because in every language you express a feeling in different ways: using alliteration, metaphors, and rhymes. Poetry in its cultural language has a mysterious sense to it: foreigners will never understand it. As a trilingual, I am able to appreciate the languages in poetry in each of the three languages that I speak: English, Russian and French.

Every language has it’s own way to communicate to the reader a strong feeling of envy and sadness. Why? Because the reader would like to meet the poet and slap them across the face for how touching the poem was. Like J.D Salinger said in the Catcher in the Rye: “What really knocks me out is a book that, when you're all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it.”

A close friend of mine loves -LOVES- poetry but is apparently incapable of writing it. Usually, I would have said: “It’s not hard, it doesn’t have to rhyme, just write about something you love.” But, as the years have passed, I’ve made a realization: that most Poets have been through a tough life and their only way of coping with it is to write. For example, Wilfred Owen, a British gay soldier in World War One, wrote mainly about how hard it was to serve in the British army; ‘My subject is war and the pity of war.’

Three years ago, when I found out my biological Russian parents had died, I was alone in Russia for three weeks, working for my adoptive dad’s Audit company. I had no one who could understand my pain, so I started to write out my pain in stanzas. It helped me get my sadness on paper. Here is one of the poems I wrote:


Looking through the crowd,

waiting for you to appear.

Could it be him?

Smiling with a grin.


6ft is his height.

A fire is ignited.

Could he show himself in the moonlight?

Oh, sweet eyes:

Blue, green, grey.

Whatever the color,

I’ll see you this summer.


Hold me tight,

when the dark causes me affright.

Sweet melodies,

create heartbreaking memories.

Was your voice just an illusion?


Craftsman? Musician?

All of these questions,

give me suspicions.

Who are you?

Could I see through,

without breaking in pieces.


My heart overthinks.

I glimpse,

at every figure, I meet.

Wishing -with all my might-

that you will be my white knight.


I was only seventeen when I wrote this poem and I was not planning on showing it to people, but the fact that I wrote it out helped me accept the fact that I had lost my parents.

Romance languages, like Spanish, French, Italien, and Portuguese are seen as romantic languages across the world. Why? Because of the way they sound.

Whenever I read French Poetry, I have the urge to sip a glass of red wine in a park wearing a summer dress with friends by my side to discuss the meaning of the poem. One of my favorite authors is Charles Baudelaire, a French poet who lived in the 19th century and wrote vivid, sexual poems and stories. The way he wrote made my whole body feel alive:

“You have to be always drunk. That's all there is to it—it's the only way. So as not to feel the horrible burden of time that breaks your back and bends you to the earth, you have to be continually drunk.

But on what? Wine, poetry or virtue, as you wish. But be drunk.”

Whenever I read Russian Poetry or stories, I always want to cuddle up in a warm blanket and sip hot chocolate. Why? Because the Russians have a way of putting words together that can create a sweet and sour dish. For example, Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), who is considered one of the founders of Russian modern literature, wrote at least a hundred works of poetry about Russian society and life.

Traveling with a poet or a writer is amazing because they will daydream about the person they met at a coffee shop that morning and wonder everything about them. Writers will sit on the grass and stay silent for the whole day until they finished a story they are passionate about. Writers and Poets will never shut up about how or that makes them feel. Make writers travel to different countries, encourage them to learn languages so they know all of the secret poetry of each country.

Some people are born to be an artist. They are born with an ability to learn and observe the world differently than other people and I think Poetry is a way of sharing everyone about your deepest feeling.


Comments

Lorna Lamon on January 24, 2020:

Writing and in particular writing poems is a great way to let go of those feelings which not only make us feel good but those feeling which have caused us pain. Your poem is touching and beautifully written, in particular the last verse.

Cornelius Nolitta from Roma, Italia on January 24, 2020:

I see myself in what you wrote. I write what I feel. Often without thinking it first, I let the words follow each other, come out on their own as I write. I put the mood of the moment on paper.

John Hansen from Queensland Australia on January 23, 2020:

I love your thoughts on poetry and writing, Anastassia. Your poem is well-written and enjoyable as well.

BRENDA ARLEDGE from Washington Court House on January 23, 2020:

You are so right.

Writers seem to write words to release the torment from their souls.

The words usually pour out...while others don't seem to understand how they can out words on paper.

I love the way you tell a story before and after your poem.

Great write.

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