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Cheating Fate ~ a Dramatic Poem

John is a poet and short fiction writer who enjoys collaborating on stories with other writers, and partaking in challenges.

Image by Clker-Free-Vector-Images from Pixabay

Image by Clker-Free-Vector-Images from Pixabay

Word Prompts Help Creativity: Week 16 Word Prompt: "Fate."

Each week fellow poet and friend, Brenda Arledge, provides us with a new word prompt to inspire and encourage us in our writing journey. I often find the chosen word very challenging and really have to wrack my poor old brain to come up with something original. This week was no exception.

That said, I am forever grateful to Brenda for motivating my muse into action. Sometimes that is easier said than done, at least when I want it to happen. Anyway, here is my response to this week's challenge: "Cheating Fate."

This piece was, in fact, also inspired by the wonderful poem The Three Fates by acclaimed Australian Poet, Rosemary Dobson.

Image by sandid from Pixabay

Image by sandid from Pixabay

Cheating Fate

At the impact of the crash, he summoned the Moirai.

Was it ethical, even his right, to expect immortality?


The vehicle uncrumpled as it quickly reversed

unembedding itself from the tree trunk.

Bark and wood in turn miraculously back in place.


His head spun, as found himself back at home,

and he stared as the hands of his watch moved anticlockwise

as the day regressed towards morning.


He sat at the desk confused, as the pen guided his hand

right to left- bottom to top,

beginning at the end, ending at the beginning.


While each cup of coffee he tried to consume,

frustratingly, just made him sleepier

and the coffee pot, grow fuller.


Finally, he fell asleep, but his dreams were fitful.

When he awoke the day began, just like the one before.

And then - there was the crash -


The sisters looked down from above.

Some called them ‘The Three Fates.’

By John Melhuish Strudwick - John Melhuish Strudwick, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1212877

By John Melhuish Strudwick - John Melhuish Strudwick, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1212877

The Three Fates ~ The Moirai

Popularly called Three Fates, in Greek Mythology they were known as the Moirai. Their names were Clotho (Spinner), Lachesis (Allotter), and Atropos (Inflexible).

It was believed that the Fates would appear within three days of someone's birth to decide their fate. The three Moirai represented the cycle of life, essentially standing for Birth, Life, and Death.

Clotho spun the “thread” of human fate, Lachesis dispensed it, and Atropos cut the thread (thus determining the individual's moment of death).

Comments

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 08, 2021:

Thank you, Devika. Much appreciated.

Devika Primić from Dubrovnik, Croatia on June 08, 2021:

Jodah You took on this challenge in a courageous manner. Your style is incredible and well-thought of indeed!

Amara from Pakistan on June 07, 2021:

My pleasure John, this comment was actually meant for poems from the porch 62, by mistake being written here. appologies.

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 07, 2021:

Thank you for those kind words, Amara. Holding my reader’s interest is what I strive for.

Amara from Pakistan on June 07, 2021:

John I always love to read your poems.. Your writing style is excellent, and you know how to hold the interest of your readers.. Very nice..

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 07, 2021:

Thank you so much, Linda. I am always trying to write something a little different. Glad you enjoyed it.

Linda Crampton from British Columbia, Canada on June 06, 2021:

I love the way in which you’ve approached this challenge. You’ve created an original and very interesting story of fate in a person’s life.

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

Thank you, Rawan.

Rawan Osama from Egypt on June 04, 2021:

Nice poem

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

Hello Audrey, yes, I thought I’d try something a bit different. So happy that you enjoyed the read. Blessings.

Audrey Hunt from Idyllwild Ca. on June 04, 2021:

Jodah. Cheating Fate is fantastic! I enjoyed this. You went out on a limb with this one and I love it!

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

Hey Brenda, the fact that you wanted to read it twice to understand what was happening is a compliment. I agree it is a bit different “out there.” boy yeah, the point is “you can’t cheat fate” it will still catch up with you. Thanks.

BRENDA ARLEDGE from Washington Court House on June 04, 2021:

John

This one us a bit out there.

What a muse you have this week!

I can see the vehicle crumpling after the crash & the wood going back into the tree.

To see the hands on one's watch spin backwards is an amazing touch.

To get us prepared for hus day to go completely backwards in time.

Starting with the ending & ending up in the beginning.

Not even coffee could keep him awake.

But then...after all that he awakes to the crash in the morning.

I guess there is no running away from fate.

This is an awesome write. I admit, I had tp reread it before I realized what you were saying...then it hit me.

It's kinda like a movie I watched once where they missed Fate's hand once only for it to get them at the end.

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

Thank you Alyssa. This is something a bit different from me. I am not comfortable writing free verse or prose poetry, but I hoped the story would carry it through. I am happy you enjoyed the poem and the mythology.

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

Denise, as they say, “You can’t cheat death, ” or “when your time is up.” I like happy endings too, but they aren’t always possible. Blessings.

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

Hi Amara. I am glad you found this an interesting read. I enjoyed writing it.

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

Vidya, I have always enjoyed the stories of Greek Mythology too. I am glad this poem worked. Thank you for reading.

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

There has to be a first for everything, Mr Happy. I think “The Moirai” are a somewhat forgotten part of Greek/Roman mythology. At least I have very rarely heard them mentioned. Thank you for reading and appreciating.

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

Thank you Glen. I like “thought-provoking.” Much appreciated.

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

Thank you, Peg. I am happy it worked, an dtnat you found the mythology interesting. Thank you for the encouraging comment.

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

So, I surprised you with this one did I, Shauna? I am glad that this worked, I had to play around with it quite a bit so hoped it would be effective. I thought of saying “the three sisters” at the start but decided on “Moirai” as I thought the reader would wonder either way what I was talking about. I am pleased you enjoyed this. Take care.

Alyssa from Ohio on June 04, 2021:

This was an unexpected, thrilling surprise! I absolutely loved your dramatic poem and the added information about the three Moirai.

Denise McGill from Fresno CA on June 04, 2021:

Wow, I liked this and was hoping for a different fate/end but we all have to face an end don't we? I love the Greek lesson too. I know about the three fates but haven't thought of them in years.

Blessings,

Denise

Amara from Pakistan on June 04, 2021:

John your response to the prompt challenge is really interesting.. I enjoyed reading it..

VIDYA D SAGAR on June 04, 2021:

An excellent response to Brenda's word prompt. You have outdone yourself this time John. It was fascinating to read about the Moirai. Greek mythology has always intrigued me. Thanks for sharing, have a great day.

Mr. Happy from Toronto, Canada on June 04, 2021:

How nice! I haven't seen anyone in my over ten years being here, mention the Moirai. So, thank You!

Like the Moirai, we too spin the "thread of life". So, they always remind me to pay attention to what I am spinning.

All the best!

Glen Rix from UK on June 04, 2021:

Original, thought -provoking. Congratulations

Peggy Woods from Houston, Texas on June 04, 2021:

You outdid yourself with this one, John! Being able to go forward and backward, or in and out of a scene, and mixing in some mythology is an outstanding interpretation of the word "fate."

Shauna L Bowling from Central Florida on June 04, 2021:

Wow, John this was creepy. I could actually see the chain of events as they happened. You mastered the art of painting a picture with words impeccably! This would actually make for a great, suspenseful movie.

I'm glad you explained Moirai. When I first read the word, I thought, "huh?". No clue what that word meant or the folklore behind it.

This is really cool, John. Love it!

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

Thank you for your kind comment, Umesh. Much appreciated.

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

Yes, I’d hate to know what happened to the occupants of the car. Thank you for reading and enjoying this article/poem.

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

I am glad that your knew of the Three Sisters, Pamela. Thank you for the kind comment in regard to the poem.

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

Hello Chitrangada, thank you for reading and finding this post interesting. Much appreciated. You have a good weekend also.

Umesh Chandra Bhatt from Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, India on June 04, 2021:

Excellent Jodah. You presented it in a brilliant way. Nice reading.

FlourishAnyway from USA on June 04, 2021:

I liked this interpretation of the word "fate." Your poem is spooky and that picture is sobering, knowing someone probably died from that.

Pamela Oglesby from Sunny Florida on June 04, 2021:

This poem really told a good story, John. This is a different take on that prompt, and it was very clever. I knew about those three sister is Greek mythology and I enjoyed this article.

Chitrangada Sharan from New Delhi, India on June 04, 2021:

Hello John!

Your response to the word prompt, fate, is an interesting read. A well crafted story in a poem, and it’s correlation with fate, and some valuable information about the Greek mythology. All together, a beautiful and thoughtful post.

‘- - and he stared as the hands of his watch moved anti-clockwise’—That’s interesting!!

Thank you for sharing this. Have a great weekend.

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

Thank you MsDora. Bless you.

Dora Weithers on June 04, 2021:

The reverse actions in the poem seem do artful and thanks for the lesson from Greek mythology. Well done!

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

Ashley, I read part 3 of your story too, "A Man Called Takeru"..intriguing I must say.

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

Thank you, Ashley. Much appreciated.

Ashley SY on June 04, 2021:

Wow~ Beautifully written...really enjoyed reading this poem :)

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

Thank you, Misbah. I am glad you enjoyed this poem and also the information about the Moirai. Yes, it was quite different to my usual style.

Misbah Sheikh from The World of Poets on June 04, 2021:

John, your response to Brenda's prompt is fantastic. The Moirai was fascinating to learn about. Thank you for bringing this up. I had never heard of this old Greek religion or mythology before. I loved reading your lovely poem, which was somewhat different from the rest of your work.

It was amazing!! Thank you for sharing. May God continue to bless you and keep you safe and well. Amen!

Blessings always

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 04, 2021:

Hi Rosina, thank you for reading and commenting. I am glad you found this to be captivating and that you learned something new. Take care.

John Hansen (author) from Queensland Australia on June 03, 2021:

Good work, getting here in time to comment, Moondot. I have a lot of trouble with that lately. You are right, I rarely write a poem that doesn't rhyme. This is a rare occasion.

Rosina S Khan on June 03, 2021:

It was interesting to know about the "The Three Fates- Moirai" and your outstandingly great poem being inspired by it. Very intriguing indeed! A marvelous response to Brenda's word prompt-Fate. Thanks for the captivating share, John.

EK Jadoon from Abbottabad Pakistan on June 03, 2021:

I think I came at right time—not late this time. This is a good poem in response to Brenda's word prompt challenge. I have learned about 'Moirai' for the first time. Thanks for sharing it with us. By the way, I have read your first poem, which doesn't contain rhyming words. It's cool as well.

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