Around the Corners: Poetry Inspired by Patricia Scott's Words, and My Challenge to Others - LetterPile - Writing and Literature
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Around the Corners: Poetry Inspired by Patricia Scott's Words, and My Challenge to Others

Author:

Ann loves to write poetry and stories. Current poetry on Nature, Travel & beyond, including varied poetic structures.

Where does this go?

Path to Who Knows Where... we explore, we find, we learn

Path to Who Knows Where... we explore, we find, we learn

Definition of a Good Poet

Patricia Scott, a fellow hubber, thinks that 'writing poetry takes a special talent' which she describes as

"a way to see around the corners and over the hills and under the seas and through the wind".

Patricia said she could not write poetry - I beg to differ! Those words convey such insight and depth of feeling, especially ‘through the wind’.

That got me thinking about those four scenarios, which in turn led me to these pieces of poetry. I hope I can do justice to Patricia’s words.


Inspiration

Photography is my passion. Nature, people and places inspire me to click the shutter often; therefore I have hundreds of photos from which to choose!

There are two pictures to match each of the four scenarios, starting with the path through the woods and the brown water turning into the green.


Brown Turns to Green

Water's Pathways

Water's Pathways

'Around the Corners'


Tracks to Tease:

Silent tread by bubbling stream,

upward I stroll on softening earth,

kicking leaves like a two-year old.

The track takes my eye up and around

to where I wonder. A road? Hope not.

A house? Maybe. Derelict history.

Walking soothes, imagination rambles,

I dream of hidden valleys, tumbling rocks

where I squeeze through the entrance

to the wizard’s tunnel.


Coloured Waters:

Sulphur stream rushing through narrow pass,

turning as it rubs shoulders with the never-budging boulders,

taking its smell into the pond where one can bathe in green,

emerging cleansed.


Climb Up! What Lies on the Other Side?

Look at the sky, look at the trees, what will you find beyond the summit? (Cheddar Gorge, Somerset)

Look at the sky, look at the trees, what will you find beyond the summit? (Cheddar Gorge, Somerset)

On the Other Side

On the Other Side

'Over the Hills'


Craggy Skyline:

Layered stone, ever upward, cricked neck

as eyes reach the top of the Gorge..

I follow to solve the mystery.

Pale sky, open, stretching sideways,

makes me anticipate a panorama

of flat lands to distant horizon.

Or perhaps another dizzying dive,

switchback of rocks and sharp cliff,

buzzard’s view of Lilliputian figures below.


Between the Hills:

Over one hill, stretching my reach to the other side,

flying across the shimmer of doldrum sea

to distant darkness shrouded in swirling storm.

Dinky cars and people on the sands, do they know

what lies behind me, over this hill? Do they know

those dark hills southward lead to a land where stories grow?

Lorna Doone’s fate still treads the moors, between the hills

where dastardly deeds and romantic waters flow to the sea.


Go Beneath the Waves

River v Sea

River v Sea

Waves Crash to Shore, Covering, Uncovering, Disturbing Beds and Stones

Waves Crash to Shore, Covering, Uncovering, Disturbing Beds and Stones

'Under the Seas'


River versus Sea:

Choppy waters, childish clashes, tedious tussles - which will win?

River Parrett mustn’t be late, flowing to sea to follow its fate,

Rushing tides push it back, battling to reclaim their place

‘twixt sand and mud.

Meeting twice daily beyond the jetty, vying for space, churning with time,

this battle fought above bed of mud and lugworms, where lurk the souls

of the taken, slipped off the jetty or walked too far, unaware of fickle quicksand under the waves.


Crashing to Shore:

Dark depths, turquoise shallows, white surf,

take it in turns to grab the gaze,

soothing rhythm, wave after wave arriving,

then thundering its beat on shore,

echoing the depths where no one goes.

In measured depth of final reach,

saltwater cools the beach’s brow,

caressing the sands, splashing the rocks,

filling the pools for crabs and limpets’ delight,

ignoring grave-caves, cruel crevices below.

I’ll take that path downwards, to feel the sand

between my toes, the breeze on my face,

the sun melting my cares away.

We’ll watch the waders, the gulls, the eagles,

the seals who dive to feed,

then rest in the sun, all of us.

I’ll think of those who work the waves to live,

to feed the world, to explore that hidden life,

spectacular in sights, sensational in dangers.

Respect it or accept whatever peril awaits.


Face of the Wind

Do you see the Face of the Wind?

Do you see the Face of the Wind?

Pushing, Stretching the Trees

Pushing, Stretching the Trees

'Through the Wind'


Invisible, Fickle Wind:

A light breeze, a south-westerly wind, blustery gale or tossing tempest,

we feel them all, invisible, mysterious.

It blows up slowly, or hits with haste, ruffles your hair or rips through the roots,

we feel it drying our lips, lifting skirts.

We listen in the night as it howls round the rafters. Will it throw away the tiles?

Will it split or poleaxe that tree?

You can hear its approach, marching up from beyond, stretching rag-doll trees,

wreaking its havoc, then leaving be.

In its wake, dried washing on the line, autumn leaves strewn on the ground,

or maybe dried crops, ruined for another year.

Fickle wind, carving its path through the trees, pushing us around, or merely

caressing the waves and reviving us.

Stirring up the classroom ’til no one listens, nerves frayed and hearts a-beat.

Send us home for we can’t learn, Miss!

We see the intention, the results on the other side, but we never see its face,

except, perhaps, on a nerve-end day when wind and clouds and rain conspire,

to leave a trace of anger in the sky.


Turning Trees Inside Out:

Old Oaks rebuff the gusts, while tender saplings fall, uprooted.

Wispy Willows bow and sway, silver-side revealed, pointing north-east.

A branch could crack but the sturdy oak holds its ground, forever,

hundreds of years’ testament to its power against the wind.

The graceful Willow rides the air, bowing, showing off its supple muscles.

Birds hold tight to lower branches of shrubs, or hunker down in their nests,

hoping to ride out the storm. Flying backwards is not their favourite pastime.

Buzzards ride the thermals, skilful at playing with the wind.

The storm might blow through the trees, through our bodies, but…

what do we see through the wind?


Around the Corner, Between the Hills, Out to the Sea

Coloured waters under a Setting Sun

Coloured waters under a Setting Sun

Challenge!

Choose one (or more) of the four criteria above and write about it - poem or prose. You have my permission to use any of the above photos, should you wish, as long as it is for this sole purpose and that you attribute them to me please. Of course, you could use any pertinent inspirational photos of your own choosing.

Let me know if you do take up the challenge, then I can add your link to this hub.

Have fun!


Responses to the challenge:

https://hubpages.com/literature/What-Waits-Around-the-Corner-a-Writing-Challenge - John Hansen

https://hubpages.com/literature/An-Ode-to-Opacity - Greg Cain

https://hubpages.com/literature/below-the-waves - Charlie Halliday

https://hubpages.com/literature/The-Inland-Seas-A-Poem - Chris Mills

https://letterpile.com/poetry/The-Sacred-Wind-Response-to-Ann-Carrs-Challenge#comment-17991137 - manatita




Power of Nature

© 2020 Ann Carr

Comments

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on July 02, 2020:

Thank you so much, Denise, for your kind words. Your comment delighted me for two particular reasons. One was the 'Lilliputian' reference which was a last minute change.

The other was your reference to the 'buzzard's view'. We have many buzzards in the skies here in Somerset and they are one of my favourites. They fly high, circle on the thermals and 'miew'. Eagles there are none, except in Scotland. Kites are in several areas but that's about it for the larger raptors, though the usual hawks are around in lots of areas of Britain. I love all the birds of prey; they fascinate me.

I had fun doing these poems and I'm pleased that you enjoyed them.

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Denise McGill from Fresno CA on July 02, 2020:

These are awesome. You are so creative. I especially like your reference to the Liliputian figures. Although I thought it very interesting that you took the buzzard's view and not an eagle or some other high-soaring bird. It makes me think you were contemptuous of the figures below and not lording over them. Fun imagery.

Blessings,

Denise

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on June 12, 2020:

Well, Verlie, I don't know what to say! What a kind and warming comment. You've made my day.

Thanks for coming back to this. Sorry to hear you're still have computer problems. I hope you manage to sort something out soon - a new computer??!

Ann

Miebakagh Fiberesima from Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NIGERIA. on June 11, 2020:

Ann's poems are inspirational and a study.

Verlie Burroughs from Canada on June 11, 2020:

Ann, I had to come back again to read and comment because the last time it was all about me, me, me, and my miserable computer crashing ( it is still crashed btw). Your keen eye, and love of words and nature blend beautifully on the page. Good work in making it a challenge, such a warm sense of good will and fellowship you generate. Kudos lady, I admire both, your talent, and your community spirit. Awesome!

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 31, 2020:

Wow! What gracious and kind comments, manatita. Thank you. I was surprised that you said 'walked with' the scenarios, as that is exactly what I do when I'm within the scenes in order to write, probably because they're all places I know well and therefore they connect to my being.

I was going for impact so I'm glad that worked!

I hope you do respond to this challenge and I'm looking forward to reading your interpretation.

Keep safe and well.

Ann

manatita44 from london on May 31, 2020:

Patricia is right and your use of the word 'insight' is refreshing. This is very close to wisdom, which of course comes from within. Everything begins within in seed form and finally manifest in the physical world. Back to your poetry..

I like how you take those scenarios and walk with them, like Lilliputians crashing on the shore. You have given them sublimity and vision and that's exquisite ... aesthetic.

I do observational poetry sometimes and they tend to connect more. In the hands of a weaver like you, the tapestry glows, like magic. However, I use the intuition and inner experience more, in probably 95% of my work.

I see the images of Keats, the sweet charm of Dickinson, the loftiness of Blake and the wizardry of Shakespeare. Then I add the wisdom of the voice within.

Your challenge is tempting. I would give the wind a totally positive spin ... whispering to the willows; drawing its breath from the gods of ancient Greece to create zephyrs, feeding and nourishing my soul.

Excellent and very impactful pieces! Have a great Pentecost. - Lantern

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 23, 2020:

Thank you, Laurie! Please do take up the challenge. Look at the photos or some of your own and just write what they suggest or..... something else!

Your visit is much appreciated.

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Laurie S Novak from Michigan on May 23, 2020:

You are an excellent writer! Wow, such amazing picturesque details! I love this! I'm up for a challenge! I will think on it. Thanks for your sharing.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 21, 2020:

Thank you, Lora, for such a generous comment! I appreciate your visit and I'm glad you enjoyed this.

In fact, it is I setting the challenge, though having re-read my title it could imply that I'm responding to one! Therefore I have amended the title to clarify.

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Lora Hollings on May 21, 2020:

These are poetic gems, Ann. You are a very talented photographer too. You held us in the grip of nature as you painted such vivid pictures, taking us with you as you described these elements of nature with such power and imagination! I loved your poems and the way that you met this challenge. Exquisitely done.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 15, 2020:

Thank you, Brenda, for your kind words.

I'm inspired by living in an area full of wildlife and being by the sea where I feel at home as I grew up by the sea (though further east).

Keep safe and well.

Ann

BRENDA ARLEDGE from Washington Court House on May 15, 2020:

Your poems are inspiring.

I love all your photos. You are a great photographer.

The one about the face in the wind is quite intriguing.

It seems like seeing places like the ones in your pictures inspire words to pour out.

Great writing.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 14, 2020:

Hello Greg! Thank you for such a great comment. I'd be pleased if you rise to the challenge and look forward to reading your response.

I appreciate your visit.

Keep safe and well.

Ann

greg cain from Moscow, Idaho, USA on May 14, 2020:

Hi Ann - I think as I read along through these I kept thinking, "Oh, this one's my fave," and then, "Nope, it's this one." At the end of the day, there is one that reminded me of days in Hawaii and Guam with waves crashing on rocks. I will give an effort to your challenge as well, most likely on the morrow. Thanks for putting all of this out there! Well done!

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 14, 2020:

Thank you, Kyler, for your kind and generous comments. I appreciate your double visit today.

Ann

Kyler J Falk from Corona, CA on May 13, 2020:

You certainly have a way with words and perspective, Ann, and I'd say that you captured the beauty and grace within it all quite splendidly. I especially enjoy the length of these pieces, and how the energy and direction all tie in to one another. Fire and rain, those are my elements from your poll; the stark contrast between the two and their every connotation tend to dictate the cycle of my life.

There's no question in my mind that you did her words justice!

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 13, 2020:

Venkatachari M: Thank you for your most generous comment. I'm glad you like the photos - the water was taken at the Roman Baths in Bath, Somerset and the clouds were taken on a walk by the sea recently. Lucky to get that one!

Great to see you today and I hope you are keeping safe and well.

Ann

Venkatachari M from Hyderabad, India on May 12, 2020:

Beautiful poems. Ann, you have wonderfully described all the four scenarios along with some wonderful pictures. The mud water turning into green and the face of the wind are excellent. I see many faces in the clouds often from my balcony, especially during the afternoon and evening hours. I wonder at the creativity of God whenever I view them.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 10, 2020:

I've just read it, John, and it's great! Well done and thanks for responding to the challenge. I've added the link to my hub.

Ann

John Hansen from Queensland Australia on May 10, 2020:

Hi Ann. I did take up your challenge. I wrote a poem called “What Waits Around the Corner.” Thanks for the prompt.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 05, 2020:

Hello Peggy! Thank you for such a lovely comment.

Cheddar Gorge is spectacular; I need a better photo that captures the height from the road to the highest part - it takes your breath away! And all of it is hidden from any other angle; I think it's the surprise of it too that is so wondrous.

Ann

Peggy Woods from Houston, Texas on May 04, 2020:

Your choice of words touches base with all of our senses, making each of your poems spring to life. I would have to say that you excelled with Patricia's challenge. I could almost smell that humid salt air and feel the warmth of the sun on my skin as I imagined myself walking along a beach. That photo of Cheddar Gorge is beautiful!

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 04, 2020:

Thank you so much, Patricia! I'm glad you liked this - all thanks to you for the inspiration. I had it as a pending file with your quote and a few notes written down, determined to get round to it. Glad I eventually managed to do so!

Keep safe and well. Your angels are much appreciated too.

Ann

Patricia Scott from North Central Florida on May 04, 2020:

O, Ann, this was amazing. Again I have been touched by words that only a poet can create within her work. All of the elements were beautiful but the one that probably resonates with me the most is the one about the seas. I grew up on the waters of Virginia and experienced so many of the wonderful things that you described the salty water, the warmth of the sun on my skin, the haunting sound of the many seabirds that would come.... And I will long remember how beautifully you Illustrated this.

"I'll think of those who work the waves to live,

to feed the world, to explore that hidden life,

spectacular in sights, sensational in dangers.

Respect it or accept whatever peril awaits."

Thank you so much for your kind words. Angels are headed your way this afternoon. Please Stay Well and safe in this most unusual time in our world. PS

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 04, 2020:

Shauna: Thank you for your great comment. I like 'tickle the nose'!

It is cool isn't it? Lots of atmosphere which I suppose is what makes it eerie too.

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Shauna L Bowling from Central Florida on May 04, 2020:

Ann, you have a very unique poetic style. As in your prose, your words paint a picture, bring imagined sounds to life, scents tickle the nose.

And, yes, I saw the face in the clouds. Eerie and cool at the same time.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 04, 2020:

Well, Dora, I've never been compared to the Romantics (Byron is one of my favourites)! That's a great thing for you to say and I'm so pleased you liked this.

It wasn't until I downloaded that photo from my camera that I saw the face in it. Pure chance!

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 04, 2020:

Thank you Flourish! The two bright parts of the sky are the eyes and the wide cloudy bit is the mouth; looks as though it's frowning/angry!

Thanks for the visit.

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Dora Weithers from The Caribbean on May 03, 2020:

Your poems read like great literature from the Romantics. Your details of the scenes from nature and your beautifully crafted phrases are what reminds me of poetry from that period. "Face of the wind" is interesting. Well done!

FlourishAnyway from USA on May 03, 2020:

Your nature poems and photos are mesmerizing. I think I do see a face in that photo!

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 03, 2020:

Oh Verlie, I sympathise; it's tedious having to tap away on a small keyboard! Thank you so much for your wonderful comment. I'm doubly pleased you liked this as your poetry is so, so good.

I hope you manage to get back to a decent computer and keyboard.

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Verlie Burroughs from Canada on May 03, 2020:

Gorgeous piece Ann. Photos, and poetry. Sorry not been around to read. My computer packed it in a couple of weeks ago with the latest Windows update so I'm just getting by with a tablet friends loaned me,and learning to write on a little tiny key board, woe is me.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 03, 2020:

Thank you, Eric. What a lovely thing to say! Glad you enjoyed pics and words!

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Eric Dierker from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A. on May 03, 2020:

I always love your poetry. Your love of words always shine through. Yahoo!! For all us readers. Just really enjoyed the pictures also.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 03, 2020:

Hello Demas! Thank you for your kind words.

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Miebakagh Fiberesima from Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NIGERIA. on May 02, 2020:

I agreed. But the best way is to put it in simple and understanding form. The poem follow the spirit of nature or natural sequence. Even a little boy/girl can understand the poem without much trouble.

Demas W Jasper from Today's America and The World Beyond on May 02, 2020:

Poetry when challenged, and poetry spontaneously rendered, it doesn't seem to matter one way or the other to y our poetic spirit. This is a nice assemblage.

Miebakagh Fiberesima from Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NIGERIA. on May 02, 2020:

Ann, you're welcomed.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 02, 2020:

I'll try, thank you, Miebakagh!

Miebakagh Fiberesima from Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NIGERIA. on May 02, 2020:

Ann, thanks for the response. Stay safe and healthy likewise.

Miebakagh Fiberesima from Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NIGERIA. on May 02, 2020:

Ann, thanks for the response. Stay safe and healthy likewise.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 02, 2020:

Thank you, Liz, for a lovely comment. Glad this took you to another place.

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Liz Westwood from UK on May 02, 2020:

Great poetry to transport us to another place and blow the cobwebs of lockdown away.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 02, 2020:

Thank you, Miebakagh, for your kind, generous comments.

Glad you enjoyed it.

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Miebakagh Fiberesima from Port Harcourt, Rivers State, NIGERIA. on May 02, 2020:

Hello Ann Carr, what a short line, but long poem?! Each line really and reasonably leads to the other. You captured nature with your pen and paper as the camera of the eye. Thanks for sharing.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 02, 2020:

Wow, Lorna! What a great comment; I'm so pleased. Glad you enjoyed the walk and the climb.

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 02, 2020:

Thank you, bill! You make me smile. And the sun is shining - and it's my birthday, so today is perfect!!

So pleased that you like this; I had great fun writing it.

Keep safe and well.

Have a super Saturday!

Ann

Lorna Lamon on May 02, 2020:

A beautiful and timeless collection of poetry Ann. It almost felt like a lovely climb through the hills where the beauty of nature is portrayed so wonderfully in your words. A truly enjoyable experience.

Bill Holland from Olympia, WA on May 02, 2020:

Patricia's words were, indeed, poetry. Your words brought that poetry to life. I was with you on the sojourn. I felt it all, loved it all, and wanted more. Brilliant, and you started my Saturday off on the right foot.

You haven't lost one ounce of your talent, my friend. Carry on!

bill

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 02, 2020:

No trouble, John. I just don't like mysteries!

Ann

John Hansen from Queensland Australia on May 02, 2020:

Ann, sorry to put you to too much trouble looking for Patricia's comment. I thought it must have been quite recent. Good luck with your search.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 02, 2020:

Rinita, thank you so much for that wonderful comment. I'm so pleased with your reaction. I really enjoyed writing these poems. Nature inspires me more than anything I think.

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 02, 2020:

I now realise, John, that those words of Patricia's were in a comment she made on one of my hubs. Must have been one of the poetry ones but I can't find it at the moment - now you've got me determined to find out!!

Ann

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 02, 2020:

Thank you, John, for such a generous comment. Funny you should choose those as your favourite lines; I was particular proud of those myself!

I'll go to find out which of Patricia's articles that was and let you know.

Keep safe and well, John.

Ann

Rinita Sen on May 02, 2020:

Imaginations galore in your poetry. There are very few people who can write exceptional prose as well as mesmerizing poetry (Emily Bronte alert:)). And you do it oh so gracefully. I am spellbound, Ann.

John Hansen from Queensland Australia on May 02, 2020:

Ann, I love your photos and the poetry inspired by them and Patricia Scott's statement. I particularly like these lines from Between the Hills:

" ..do they know what lies behind me, over this hill? Do they know

those dark hills southward lead to a land where stories grow?

Lorna Doone’s fate still treads the moors, between the hills

where dastardly deeds and romantic waters flow to the sea."

Can you tell me what article of Patricia's you were referring to.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 01, 2020:

You've made my day, Ruby. What a beautiful thing to say! I'm thrilled that you like this and even more thrilled that you are thinking of rising to the challenge. I admire your poetry and can't wait to see what you come up with.

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Ruby Jean Richert from Southern Illinois on May 01, 2020:

You have the ability to take the reader to unseen adventures, opening our eye's along the way. Your use of words is what makes your poetry so beautiful. I will ponder the possibility of writing a poem using one of your photo prompts.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 01, 2020:

Pamela, thank you very much for your generous comments. I'm pleased you enjoyed this.

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 01, 2020:

Thank you, Rosina, for your kind words. I'm hoping a few will take up the challenge. Why not have a go yourself?!

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Pamela Oglesby from Sunny Florida on May 01, 2020:

Ann, these poems are beautiful You certainly are good at writing poetry and I will look forward to some more in the future. I also really like you pictures as they are an inspiration also.

Rosina S Khan on May 01, 2020:

Beautiful poetry, Ann. I would love to read the proses/poems who respond to your challenge. It would be fun for sure. Thank you for sharing the poems and of course, for throwing the challenge.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on May 01, 2020:

Hello Louise! Great to see you today.

Thank you for reading and commenting. Yes, Cheddar Gorge is spectacular, especially as there is no hint of it before you actually get there!

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Louise Powles from Norfolk, England on May 01, 2020:

I loved the poetry, Ann. I liked the pictures too. Cheddar Gorge is somewhere I've been to, but I would love to.