Speed Bumps: Sometimes Good, Bad, and Deceptive and Dangerous

Updated on June 27, 2019
kenneth avery profile image

Kenneth is a natural-born southerner and grew up his entire life in the south where he has resided now for 63 years in Hamilton, Al.,

Notice How Deceptive Speed Bumps Can Be

Guess Who Was Responsible

for speed bumps? Arthur Holly Compton in 1953. Yes. Compton was the idea man behind speed bumps. And all of this time, (me included), we never bothered to research this wonderful life-saving idea. For my part of the ignorance, I apologize, Arthur Holly Compton.

In all honesty and truthful, until I studied the speed bumps, I never dreamed just how powerful these obscure, deceptive obstructions in the city and open road can be. The speed bump(s) simply do not know their own strength. I am not joking. Just watch the video at the top. I did. I laughed (in a civil fashion) trying to hold back an unbridled vulgar laugh that most mules would envy. You'll be glad that you watched it.

Studying speed bumps has opened up a brand-new door of wisdom that I never knew existed until an hour ago. I was just looking over some items on my desktop and decided to trash them to make space on my hard-drive and the thought hit me: learn what you can about speed bumps. So this is where we are right now. And the journey has really been a joy.

Speed Bump Captured in Helsinki 2018.
Speed Bump Captured in Helsinki 2018. | Source

Why Do Most Automobile Drivers

seethe with complete anger when they see a speed bump up ahead? I suppose that there are several answers, but I will stay with, speed bumps only cause me to be late when I am traveling to work. This is why the drivers hate speed bumps, but speaking as a rural man who was born in the sticks in northwest Alabama, if these angry drivers would just get out of bed, shower, dress, eat, and kiss their companion, they would be on time, every time. And no more harsh words spewing from the mouths of these angry drivers. Am I right or am I right?

Speed bumps did not ask to be formed where they are right now. Drivers, mostly-angry drivers, the late-to-work drivers were responsible for the local authorities to place an humble speed bump smack dab in the middle of the busy street, but not to be cursed at every morning and evening. The speed bump, if you stop and think, are very valuable to the cities that they serve--and get this one: all for NOTHING! This is true. Speed bumps are run over, jumped over and rammed at high speed simply because "these" hot head drivers do not like speed bumps and it is a game of vengeance and "these" drivers also have the ignorant mindset that says if they continue to drive wild as a mule on LSD, the city leaders will do away with speed bumps.

Let me tell you that the MORE that these angry motorists continue to drive like fools, the speed bumps will remain. Simple thinking in action. Plus, the more that angry, smart alec drivers continue to hit and jump the speed bump, the more that their cars and trucks are harmed with each hit and jump. The costs to repair the automobiles can be staggering. But not if these angry drivers will acknowledge that they have Anger Issues, then get professional help, their driving will be slower and safer and no more repair bills to the mechanic and body shop.

Watch out! Speed Bump Ahead.
Watch out! Speed Bump Ahead. | Source

I Need To Break Down Speed Bumps

and then tell you a few understandable facts. You might be shocked. Here for your studying pleasure are: Five Facts You Never Knew About Speed Bumps:

1. Modern Speed Bumps Were Invented by a Renowned Physicist: Arthur Holly Compton in 1953.

An early form of speed bumps was implemented in Chatham, New Jersey in 1906. Workers raised crosswalks five inches to reduce drivers’ speed.

  • However, modern speed bumps were introduced in the 1950s. After winning the Nobel Prize for discoveries in electromagnetic theory, Arthur Holly Compton noticed a problem that was unrelated to his field of expertise. Drivers frequently sped past Washington University, where he worked. In 1953, he designed the first speed bump, which he called a “traffic control bump.”

2. Speed Bumps Are Known By Many Different Names:

Speaking of “traffic control bumps,” speed bumps have many names or nicknames in different languages and dialects:

British English-“sleeping police officer”

New Zealand English-“judder bar”

Puerto Rico-“muerto” (dead person)

Argentina-“lomos de burro” (donkeys’ backs)

Although speed bumps go by different names, these examples show that they are commonplace and important in many parts of the world.

3. Speed Bumps Can Be Made of Several Different Materials

  • Speed bumps are typically made of asphalt or concrete because of these materials’ durability. However, speed bumps can also be made of rubber, metal, or recycled plastic. Rubber speed bumps can be bolted to the road, making it possible to remove them later.

4. Speed Bumps are Different from Speed Humps

You may assume that speed bumps and speed humps are interchangeable. However, speed bumps and speed humps differ in several important ways:

  • Speed reduced-While speed bumps reduce speed to as low as 5 mph, speed humps reduce speed to about 20 mph.

  • Use-Speed bumps are often placed in parking lots and private roads and driveways. However, they are not used on public roads because they may endanger drivers who don’t expect them. Speed humps can be placed on public roads and are often placed near crosswalks. They aren’t placed on major roads where they could disrupt the routes of emergency vehicles and buses.

  • Despite their differences, speed bumps and speed humps both perform the same function: reduce vehicle speed to promote safety for drivers and pedestrians. They can also improve traffic flow and reduce collisions.

5. There Are Other Types of Speed-Reducing Devices.

While less common, other types of speed bumps exist. They include:

  • Dynamic speed bumps can sense the speed of a vehicle and only activate if the vehicle reaches certain speeds.

  • Speed cushions are several small speed humps with a space between each. Wide emergency vehicles and buses can straddle the speed cushion and continue at their normal speed.

  • Speed tables consist of a long speed hump with a flat section in the middle. They cause a less noticeable decrease in speed than other speed devices. Modern technology has made all kinds of speed bumps increasingly safer and more durable.

Now that we all know a little bit more about speed bumps, I am urging everyone (who drives) to drive a little slower and by doing this simple act . . .you can save LIVE(S). And right now, there is no need for me to add anything to this piece

Except . . .all of the writing/typing of the text in this piece was produced in my very own recliner in our living room, not behind the wheel of our car. Thanks, Kenneth.

https://www.acplm.net/5-things-didnt-know-speed-bumps/

June 26, 2019_________________________________________________


W130 Road Hump Warning Sign Ireland.If You See One Of These Signs . . .Slow Down!
W130 Road Hump Warning Sign Ireland.If You See One Of These Signs . . .Slow Down! | Source

Questions & Answers

    © 2019 Kenneth Avery

    Comments

      0 of 8192 characters used
      Post Comment
      • profile image

        Ken Avery 

        4 months ago

        Liz Eias: love the remark, :it;s a speed bump. That is what shock absorbers are for--deal with it. LOL. You nailed the comment to the wall. Loved it.

        And the cutesy thing about a town that claims here is used for traffic calming devices," How much more can we Writers of The Hidden Hub take?

        Have a great 4th, Liz E.

      • profile image

        Ken Avery 

        4 months ago

        Liz Westwood (love your name), thank you much for your neat comments. And so sorry about your aunt and her accident and sure enough, a speed bump scored again.

        Hey, I promise you another thing: when you fly over here, notice that we have NO speed bumps where I live.

        But I have coffee and tea.

        Liz W., write me anytime.

      • DzyMsLizzy profile image

        Liz Elias 

        4 months ago from Oakley, CA

        One cutesy name that city officials here use is "traffic calming devices." Pffft!!

        I understand the purpose, and grudgingly admit the necessity of slowing down idiot speeding drivers, particlularly near schools.

        That said, if you are NOT speeding, (unless you are driving one of those ridiculously "lowered" vehicles), they may be crossed at the normal speed limit without incident or damage to your vehicle.

        What really chaps my hide is people I see (driving cars or trucks with normal ground clearance) slowing to a walking pace, and crawling across the things one wheel at a time. Best course of action: take foot from gas pedal and just coast across.

        It's a bump. That's what shock absorbers are for. Deal with it!

      • Eurofile profile image

        Liz Westwood 

        4 months ago from UK

        My aunt travelled to the States to visit the theme parks in Florida. The first evening they left their hotel to get food, my aunt tripped over a speed bump and broke her pelvis. After spending a few days in hospital she was pushed around the parks in a wheelchair. The only upside was that she went to the front of the queues in the parks.

      working

      This website uses cookies

      As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, letterpile.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

      For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://letterpile.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

      Show Details
      Necessary
      HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
      LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
      Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
      AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
      Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
      CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
      Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
      Features
      Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
      Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
      Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
      Marketing
      Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
      Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
      Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
      Statistics
      Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
      ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
      ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)