He Wore Silver and Gold: The Life of Gerald (Gerry) Glenn Jones: Article - 'Stolen Occupied Horse'

Updated on July 30, 2018
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Gerry Glenn Jones is a writer of many different subjects. One of his main contributions to writing is his stories of horror and mystery.

Finding the Owner of the Stolen Horse

Present uniform shoulder patch for the St. Louis County Police Department in 2018.
Present uniform shoulder patch for the St. Louis County Police Department in 2018. | Source

St. Louis County Police Department

In law enforcement jargon when you hear the words, "I'm stopping a stolen occupied vehicle," it means that the police officer has located a motor vehicle that was reported stolen. It lets dispatch and other officers know that he/she will need assistance, and they respond and keep dispatch informed of how the stop is proceeding.

I never dreamed I would add another type of vehicle to those words of police jargon, but I did on a summer night in 1982. I only thought of it after a particular event was over. The new presentation was, "I'm stopping a stolen occupied horse."

This was the uniform shoulder patch used by the St. louis County Police during the time I served there.
This was the uniform shoulder patch used by the St. louis County Police during the time I served there. | Source

Gerald (Gerry) Jones: A Field Training Officer

Before I get into the heart of the incident, I should lay out some groundwork. The Year was 1982, and I was a "Field Training Officer" for the St. Louis County Police Department in Missouri. My duties as a training officer were to patrol a beat just like any other officer, but with the additional duties of field training a new officer, after they had successfully completed a 16-week academy training course at the Greater St. Louis Police Academy.

My duty as it was with all other training officers in the department, was to take what the trainees had learned in the academy, and show them how to apply it effectively in daily on-duty situations, and rank their performance in a 12-week assessment period.

St. Louis County Police Headquarters August 16, 2015
St. Louis County Police Headquarters August 16, 2015 | Source

Gerald (Gerry) Jones and Gary Berra on Patrol

During the period this article is based on, I was field training Gary Berra, who would later proceed through the ranks to attain the status of a Lieutenant. He was a very knowledgeable and efficient officer, so it made my job easy.

My permanently assigned was beat 4 in the original 5th precinct, with our substation in Ballwin, Missouri. My beat was the largest one in St. Louis County at that time, and it consisted of mostly rural areas, with small municipalities. The biggest feature of my beat was the fact that Six Flags Over Mid-America was in it, and it was part of my patrol duties also.

St. Louis County Police car in 2016
St. Louis County Police car in 2016 | Source

Stolen Occupied Horse

As probationary police officer, Gary Berra and I patrolled the area near Glencoe, Missouri, we talked about how uneventful that Summer night had been, but that was about to change in a hurry. We were headed north on Mo. Hwy 109, when we observed two young men riding a horse, and approaching us on the west shoulder of Hwy 109. The horse did not have a bridle or saddle; however, it did have an unusual saddle blanket in the form of a U.S. flag.

I immediately recognized the two men riding the horse. I had arrested then before, and they both lived in Glencoe. I also knew they didn't own a horse. As I slowed down and stopped the patrol car, both men jumped off the horse and fled into the woods on the west side of the highway. One was holding a shiny object that I suspected might a handgun. I immediately told officer Berra to call this in to dispatch and stay with the horse, which had stopped when the men jumped off her.


2014 National Police Week: Assemblance Before 26th Annual Candlelight Vigil at the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in the 400 block of E Street, NW, Washington DC on Tuesday evening, 14 May 2014 by Elvert Barnes Photography
2014 National Police Week: Assemblance Before 26th Annual Candlelight Vigil at the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in the 400 block of E Street, NW, Washington DC on Tuesday evening, 14 May 2014 by Elvert Barnes Photography | Source

One Suspect is Arrested

As I ran into the woods after the suspects, I pulled my duty weapon, because I thought one of them might be armed. I also did not turn on my flashlight, which I carried in my left hand. I knew that if I turned it on, it would give my position away, and give them a target. I also didn't run but walked softly, and in a direction, I thought they might try to take home. I stopped in an area that would be in a direct course to their homes in Glencoe, and stood behind a tree and waited. After only waiting a short time, I heard footsteps in the leaves. Someone was approaching my exact location. When the suspect was within about 25 feet from me, I stepped from behind the tree and ordered the man to stop, and drop what he had in his hand. I now had turned my flashlight on and could still see something shiny in his hand.

The suspect was startled, but stopped and dropped the object, which I then recognized as an open can of beer. It seemed that getting arrested was less important than losing his beer. As I ordered him to the ground, I recognized he was a petty criminal that went by the nickname "Rooster." As I placed the cuffs on him, I told him he was under arrest for suspicion of stealing property with a value over $150.00 (stealing a horse.) I also advised him of his Miranda Rights and asked him where his accomplice was? I had also recognized his partner as a petty criminal that I had arrested before. His last name, believe or not, was "Leuthauser."

Rooster, immediately said he didn't know what I was talking about, and that he had done nothing wrong. He was also very intoxicated. I then observed course hair on his pants that appeared to be the same color as the stolen horse. He also had an order that I recognized as sweat from a horse. I had horses of my on while growing up, so I knew what they smelled like.

7 St. Louis County Police Precincts in 2018 There were 5 St. Louis County Precincts in 1982 when this incident occurred.
7 St. Louis County Police Precincts in 2018 There were 5 St. Louis County Precincts in 1982 when this incident occurred. | Source

Horse is Returned to Owner

It was an extraordinary site as I rode the horse up Old State with a procession of patrol cars followed me with their emergency lights on, in order to protect me and the horse from other vehicles. When we arrived at the intersection of Highway 109 and Old State Road, she turned right onto Old State Road and proceeded for about seven-tenths of a mile, where she turned left onto Red Tail Hawk Rd., and went a short distance and stopped at a gate to a small pasture.

I got off the horse and walked to the house directly across the street. My knock awakened the homeowner, who opened the door with a surprised look on his face. I asked if he had a horse missing, and stated that he didn't think he did, but when I pointed toward the horse, he immediately said, "Yes that's my horse." I explained to him what had happened, took his information as he opened the gate and let the horse into the pasture. We later arrested Leuthauser without incident. Both subjects were later convicted of the crime, and also of stealing a flag, which we learned had been taken from a flagpole at the Glencoe Post Office.

One of the police helicopters that serve St. Louis City, St. Louis County and St. Charles County
One of the police helicopters that serve St. Louis City, St. Louis County and St. Charles County | Source

An Unusual way of Locating the Owner of the Stolen Horse

By this time, I could hear the "calvary," other police officers responding, with sirens blaring. When I reached the location where this incident had started, I saw Officer Berra standing by the horse, holding onto its mane. I also observed a flurry of police cars with their red lights flashing at the stop area, with others still arriving, since the call had been transmitted for "an officer in need of aid."

As I placed the suspect in our police car, I was asked by another officer if I knew who the horse belonged too, and I told him I didn't, but I had an idea how to find out. I climbed onto the back of the horse, who appeared to be old and sickly. I gave her a slight nudge, and she immediately turned around an starting slowly walking the opposite way on Highway 109. She didn't have a bridle, and I didn't try and control her direction, because I knew that horse, like many other animals, had an uncanny sense of direction to where she lived.


St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar, February 2015 Chief Jon Belmar was the last probationary officer, I helped train while I was there. He shot up through the ranks, and has made a great chief. I salute you sir!
St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar, February 2015 Chief Jon Belmar was the last probationary officer, I helped train while I was there. He shot up through the ranks, and has made a great chief. I salute you sir! | Source

Conclusion

The Glencoe Post Office was the location of another incident later, where I almost lost my life but was saved by my training and the Grace of God. This true story will be told in a future article.

If you would like to follow my exciting life; God protected life, continue to read my articles. You can also find articles that are in the chronological order of my life at Gerald (Gerry) Glenn Jones: He Wore Silver and Gold, and if you know me, you may even be in one. But, in closing, I must say "God Bless the St. Louis County Police Department and you all!"

Questions & Answers

    © 2018 Gerry Glenn Jones

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      • Pamela99 profile image

        Pamela Oglesby 

        3 months ago from Sunny Florida

        i enjoyed readig about the stolen horse and your experience. You really never know what is in someone's hand when they are running away. You like all police had a dangerous job.

      • Gerry Glenn Jones profile imageAUTHOR

        Gerry Glenn Jones 

        3 months ago from Somerville, Tennessee

        Yes, it is true Peggy, officers must make a split second decision on whether to fire or not. Also, the ones that have, either not been trained well or just basically, didn't need to be in law enforcement in the first place, are usually the ones that fire when it wasn't necessary. Thank you so much for reading my articles. I enjoy yours also.

      • Peggy W profile image

        Peggy Woods 

        3 months ago from Houston, Texas

        It is nice that the horse knew its way home and that the owner got his horse back. You bring these stories to life with your writing. That beer can could have been a gun. It is easy to understand how shooting accidents sometimes happen in the spur of a moment.

      • Gerry Glenn Jones profile imageAUTHOR

        Gerry Glenn Jones 

        3 months ago from Somerville, Tennessee

        Being born on a farm in Mississippi, I learned a lot about animal instincts Linda, and I also learned they have a better sense of direction than we do. You should write an article about it since you have so much knowledge in this area. I can't wait to read it!

      • AliciaC profile image

        Linda Crampton 

        3 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

        This is another interesting installment of your biography. I love the thought of the horse knowing where she lived and taking you there.

      • Gerry Glenn Jones profile imageAUTHOR

        Gerry Glenn Jones 

        3 months ago from Somerville, Tennessee

        Soon, very soon Pat and you will be in it!

      • profile image

        Pat 

        3 months ago

        Gerry Jones was a great cop. He was tough but fair. Gerry and I met while I was riding along with the St. Louis County Police to decide if it was my calling. We became fast friends. I have Gerry for 35+ years. He wrote stories about his work and some fictional stories based on some life events. I always told him he should become a writer. I am so glad he has. Now when will you finally compile them into a book? I'll be the first in line for an autographed copy!

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