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Applause For Traffic Cops

Kenneth is a rural citizen of Hamilton, Ala., and has begun to observe life and certain things and people helping him to write about them.

Many is The Time When

I have ridden in a car with my family and passed what I thought was (a) man standing between the lanes in the highway ahead and then it flashed through my mind that someone is going to hit him. The cop, not my dad who, by the way, was an expert driver. But when dad saw the traffic cop, his inner-self led him to slow down instantly or face a stern scolding by the cop or worse, a traffic citation. Neither happened. And we carried on with our day’s travel.

As the sunshine and day began to fade away, my thoughts returned back to the lone, sad traffic cop who makes his living standing-up in one place, in the hot or cold asphalt, dressed in a heavy uniform that fiber (in his uniform) absorbs heat, and this guy stands all day long. He must, I thought, be in excellent shape, but his small, protruding belly gave away his once-star running back on his high school that is now just a deserted building (thanks to proration), but thanks to years working inside the city’s police department, he has a job. One job. That one job is important. Not so important that President Trump will call him at anytime and ask how it’s going? Or . . .Presidential-hopeful, Joe Biden, will get his speech writer (on call 24/) to get him to write Biden a cracker-jack speech and make a surprise call to this lonesome traffic cop on NBC’s Today Show with whomever is the hosts at the current time.

applause-for-traffic-cops
applause-for-traffic-cops

The Traffic Cop

One Thursday Morning During Dennis’ Shift

he has worked a pretty slow traffic day, which is a miracle, Dennis slows down and sits down in the rain shelter (with police colors) that the police union had been after the city for years to get their traffic and beat police officers a place where they can stay when it is raining or the sun is dangerously-hot. While Dennis sits and contemplates his past 43 years, his thought process began to simmer and he writes down the following thoughts others have said about him and how he should feel.

I cannot take sides with Dennis. I am an impartial man. Or try to be. Nor can I take sides with Eunice. Bless her heart. I just wanted to make that point clear.

what is he? Human? Machine? A very bad dream? Maybe one of the three, maybe all three. But Dennis for some reason, has his inner-pride at knowing that his efforts on the police force are not forgotten by the Almighty. His efforts are not remembered by the police chief or his assistants. And they do not want to know about Dennis. Do not ask me why, but I can assure you that somewhere out there in our world stands a lot of cops, both traffic and regular cops who think what’s the use? Then he knows that with God’s help, many good things have been accomplished just because he (or she) was on duty.

What makes-up the traffic cop? He is a dollar’s worth of silver, 80 cents worth of gold plating and 50 cents worth of body coating to keep the rain and snow out of his old, rusty body. Dennis and those like him, are sometimes looked upon as rebels in a foreign land. Out of step by modern society, but they somehow continue the work that numerous traffic and regular patrolmen and women have worked to carve the highway of history and pride just so the police can help to keep his citizens safe.

The traffic cop covered with blue clothing used to stand-out from the bland crowd, but somehow that uniform faded some, but not one-hundred percent. It’s not the uniform anyway. It’s the man or woman who us wearing that faded blue uniform. The cop knows his trade well. And does make his or her share of human mistakes that he reports to his squad sergeant and with a week off (with pay), Dennis and those like him, who follow the rules, dot the i’s and cross the t’s are back on the beat again—watching how the traffic is flowing and at the same time keeping a glimpse of the sidewalk for known shoplifters, con artists, dope dealers, thieves and abusers of children, elderly people, the martial partner and even animals. Dennis does not judge these people. He just arrests them or gives them a stern warning, but knows in his heart that “crime does not pay,” is a corny saying, but all in all, it still works.

The lone traffic cop takes on a gang of scabs who dared to cross the picket line of personnel who were on strike.

The lone traffic cop takes on a gang of scabs who dared to cross the picket line of personnel who were on strike.

The traffic cop covered with blue clothing used to stand-out from the bland crowd, but somehow that uniform faded some, but not one-hundred percent. It’s not the uniform anyway. It’s the man or woman who us wearing that faded blue uniform. The cop knows his trade well. And does make his or her share of human mistakes that he reports to his squad sergeant and with a week off (with pay), Dennis and those like him, who follow the rules, dot the i’s and cross the t’s are back on the beat again—watching how the traffic is flowing and at the same time keeping a glimpse of the sidewalk for known shoplifters, con artists, dope dealers, thieves and abusers of children, elderly people, the martial partner and even animals. Dennis does not judge these people. He just arrests them or gives them a stern warning, but knows in his heart that “crime does not pay,” is a corny saying, but all in all, it still works.

The traffic cop is seldom told by the motorists where he safely guides their car, thanks or a thank you, officer, because today’s society is a “what’s in it for me,” type of thinking. I can do this many times. But the true happiness (to me) is when I go out of my way of my normal pathway and do something for the traffic cop, minister, soldier, school teacher and pastors and it does not have to be a big deal, just a sincere “thanks” for all you do for us in life. That’s all. Not hard at all. Sure, I won’t mislead you. There are some, even the traffic cop or the people that I named in the last sentence, who are so cold-hearted and selfish that they will just look sternly at you and not speak a word. Look at it this way: you will be the one being blessed, not them.

When I put myself into the shoes of a traffic cop, I get scared. Really scared out of my wits. Simply because I have never had to help keep fast-moving traffic moving without incident and even if I did have the training, there is always a handful of selfish drivers who demand to do things their way. This is when the traffic cop has to stop that rude driver who is also dangerous behind the wheel of an automobile and write them a ticket.

And the best words ever asked by these self-appointed perfect folks upon receiving the ticket that the traffic cop wrote and handed to them, “what’s this for? I did not do anything, that old guy in the pick-up truck had no business driving 45 miles per hour! Now throw this ticket away, officer, or see my lawyer!”

The cop humbly replies, “Ma’am (or sir), 45 is the correct speed limit here and that elderly gentleman was driving 40 miles per hour as gauged by my radar gun! And you may get your lawyer because if you fail to pay this ticket, a warrant will be issued for your arrest and if the judge finds you guilty, you can spend up to 30 days in jail.”

Thank God for the traffic cops all across the world who do tough, thankless jobs, but have the strongest backbones you ever saw!

April 11, 2020______________________________________________________


Cops, officers, are made-up of women who are as qualified as men to do the job.

Cops, officers, are made-up of women who are as qualified as men to do the job.

© 2020 Kenneth Avery

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