Sharing a Memory About "Bud"

Updated on January 23, 2019
kenneth avery profile image

Kenneth is a natural-born southerner and grew up his entire life in the south where he has resided now for 63 years in Hamilton, Al.,

1950s Puerto Rican motorcycle cop.
1950s Puerto Rican motorcycle cop. | Source

Welcome, Friends, to Another Time and Space

that most of people my age are either dead or in a state of forgetfulness. I do not know which is worse. If you want a true definition of worse, then one memory that surfaces is "Bud." Not Weiser. Not Wilkinson, "proud to be an Okie from Muskogee," but just plain "Bud," who did have a last name, an humble name mingled with integrity, but I cannot use it here for fear that some of his relations or pals might be alive (miracle) and read this and feel so depressed that they will not show their face in public.

In 1971, I was on top of the Hamilton High School roof, well no, I just told you that lie to boast on myself a little, so I had just passed the Alabama Driver's License examination and passed with "the skin of my teeth," as the Trooper told me as I killed the engine when my test was over. He meant it too. But in the years to come, I've never found out why an Alabama State Trooper was in full-uniform with his sidearm just to give nervous teenagers their driver's test. Was the Dept. of Safety, the governing body who called the shots for State Troopers, afraid that "we" the Young Generation would get into their car with the Trooper and mentally count to three then put their foot to the floor? Although no one ever tried it, I wonder if my life would have been remembered if I had tried it?

Think about it. The State Trooper, License Testor

on the passenger side and the whacked-out teenager who was more evil than rambunctious, yelling, power to the animals, and passing everything sight until the Trooper, with no other choice, pulled his .45 and put a couple of bullets into wild teen who would make Jim Morrison as tame as a Sunday School teacher in rural Mississippi, and think about his two choices: to take his chances and if the wild teen rammed another car or God forbid, jump from the moving vehicle which meant pure death not only for him, but the poor teenager who has just realized that LSD mixed with Wildcat Whiskey can cause anyone problems?

Then There Was "Bud." always cordial when he did his patrolman duties for the City of Hamilton where I live and retired from. At this writing, "Bud," has been deceased over five years from a cruel death by Cancer, and his sweet wife was left to carry on the name and help keep his memories alive for his sons, Ricky and Steve, who by the way, are not wild, but living productive lives helping to stay gainfully employed.

No time to discuss Ricky and Steve since this piece is about "Bud," because that is just what this hub is about--a soft-spoken city policeman who never pulled his gun no matter the situation. Not that he was a real-life Andy Taylor, it was if " Bud,"could solve a problem without his gun, then do it. And he did. But only to help someone who was bound for jail to stay at home and sober-up. " Bud" made lots of sense. His thinking about drunks were, as he told it, tough on a drunk to sober up in jail because of that awful stigma about policemen, their night sticks and .45s on their side. I wish that could publish the exact number of intoxicated people--young and old together who "Bud" worked to keep them home and not a statistic in the Hamilton, Ala. Jail, to be honest, the jail was not a bad gig to play. I never did. Or wanted to. Not as long as I knew that "Bud" on duty. I had that much respect for this man who never said ten words to me.

Years Went Like Lightning

and my life was more involved than I had expected—curfews, job hunting, studying, and looking for a girl to share my life. I was told one Thursday evening (prior to my graduation in May of 1972), that I would not be attending college because I told my dad that I would just get a job to help the family and I wish right here and now that you could see the look of relief on his face that to this time-frame, didn’t look and worried like most of the Older Generation who came up in the 40s.

My dad had come up knowing how to make a living with his hands and I give him credit for being able to fix automobile motors; lay blocks and brick; build houses and pretty much anything that anyone would ask him to do. I watched him work and I tried to mimic his work ethic, but fell flat on my face because I was fired from two jobs and left the other to go to work somewhere on my own and that went for 23 years and I grew thankful as the years went by.

But “Bud” The Policeman

soon had outgrown the Hamilton, Ala., City Police Force and went to work as a Deputy in the Marion County, Ala., Sheriff’s Dept., and even in his duties as a deputy, he carried himself in the same manner as he had with the City Police Force—quiet spoken, respectful, and still had the gift to let a drunk sleep it off at home rather than in some cold jail cell.

“Bud,” was no respecter of persons because if a guy was 17 or 47, and was seen as intoxicated in public behind the wheel, he was going to face some strict advice, but peppered with some sound advice: “don’t you know that your alcohol could kill someone out there and you too?” he was known to say and most drinking people would stay clear of “Bud,” and stay at home with their boozing. I suppose that there is a lesson for someone to learn. I somehow overlooked it.

One Night While I Was Talking

to my dad and not really talking about anything serious, the subject of the police came on his lips and before I could say what I was thinking about the police, he said that I never knew it, but he had told “Bud,” if he were on duty during the weekend, to keep a look-out for me and keep him from whatever trouble I might fall into.”

“Bud,” told my dad that he did see me along with my four friends and all we did was sit around our parked cars around our courthouse and talk. That was it. Talk. That sunk into me in a good way because even today, I still remember “Bud,” and one day when I leave this life, I want to meet him again and watch him on patrol in the celestial glories somewhere beyond life itself.

January 24, 2019_______________________________________


Officer Natalie Corona a beat police officer. I publish this photo and the one at the top in memory of my good friend, "Bud."
Officer Natalie Corona a beat police officer. I publish this photo and the one at the top in memory of my good friend, "Bud." | Source

Questions & Answers

    © 2019 Kenneth Avery

    Comments

      0 of 8192 characters used
      Post Comment
      • profile image

        Ken Avery 

        4 months ago

        MH: I cannot do that because my wife and I live on a fixed income. And not to overload you, but the medical bills (for me) are piing up so we get to hang up on a number of shrewd bill connectors . . .and ya, da, ya, da.

        Later.

      • Mr. Happy profile image

        Mr. Happy 

        5 months ago from Toronto, Canada

        Haha! You gotta be careful with inviting me places because more often than not, I show up. Mrs. Lynda Martin whom I met here on Hubpages invited me to Florida and I went. Same with Mr. Xavier (Spirit Whisperer on Hubpages)), he invited me to the Isle of Man (between Ireland and England) and I showed-up. So ... You gotta be careful with invitations when it comes to Mr. Happy: he shows up, haha!!

      • profile image

        Ken Avery 

        5 months ago

        John: a sincere thank you for your comment about my friend, Bud. This was his real name and all he ever did was either police or sheriff dept. work and he did excellent work.

        Peace. Write me soon.

      • profile image

        Ken Avery 

        5 months ago

        Mr. Happy: it is always a treat to read your comments because they are so honest. I appreciate that and why don't you try to visit me here in Alabama? At least think about it.

        Peace and Thank You again for your comments.

      • Mr. Happy profile image

        Mr. Happy 

        5 months ago from Toronto, Canada

        "In 1971 ... I had just passed the Alabama Driver's License examination" - Just curious, did You guys have manual cars back then? Or, where they still mostly all automatic?I can't recall seeing any manual American cars.

        I enjoyed your story. Thanks for sharing bits of Hamilton, Alabama history. By the way, I guess You didn;t go to Woodstock? Perhaps a little too young still? Man ... I'm bummed-out about missing that. On the other hand, it's probably good I wasn't there. If I would not have over-dosed, I probably would have died of sadness after Janice passed away. So, maybe it's good I wasn't around. Plus, I got work to do nowadays and in the future, which I cannot miss.

        Well, thank You for your piece of writing and very nice of You to remember Mr. "Bud". All the best to You, your family and all the best to Mr. "Bud", whatever his Spirit is doing and his family as well!

        Untile again: *bow* : )

      • Jodah profile image

        John Hansen 

        5 months ago from Queensland Australia

        A nice way to remember someone you respected and was obviously a good person. Thanks for sharing a little about "Bud."

      working

      This website uses cookies

      As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, letterpile.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

      For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://letterpile.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

      Show Details
      Necessary
      HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
      LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
      Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
      AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
      Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
      CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
      Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
      Features
      Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
      Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
      Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
      Marketing
      Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
      Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
      Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
      Statistics
      Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
      ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
      ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)