My Favorite Uncle

Updated on October 18, 2018
Paul Kuehn profile image

One of Paul's passions is researching and narrating family history. He has written many articles about grandparents and great-grandparents.

My Favorite Uncle

My father is on the left and Uncle Augie is on the right.  Picture taken about 1970.
My father is on the left and Uncle Augie is on the right. Picture taken about 1970. | Source

August Carl Kuehn, fondly remembered as Uncle Augie was always my favorite uncle. Beginning at an early age, I always looked forward to visiting his apartment in Milwaukee. After later moving to a farm, it was always a joy and there was excitement seeing his car pulling into our driveway.

As a boy, I loved baseball. Uncle Augie shared my passion for baseball and even tried to teach me how to play golf.

Whenever Augie visited our farm, he brought his camera along and took many pictures. He also had many interesting things to talk about.

In this article, I reminisce about my uncle's life and how I best remember him.

Uncle Augie's Early Life - 1914-1929

My favorite uncle, August Kuehn, was born in 1914 in Door County, Wisconsin. He was the oldest child of my grandparents, Charles August Kuehn and Mary Kroll Kuehn. Uncle Augie's brothers included my father, Charles George, born in 1916, and Uncle Richard Paul (Dick) in 1921. His sisters were my aunts, Marie, born in 1918, Laura in 1923, Helen in 1926, and Florence born in 1929.

Surprisingly, my father had no stories to tell about Uncle Augie when he and my dad were kids in Egg Harbor Township in Door County in the 1920s. From a picture shared by my second cousin, Margie Kuehn Nelson, I learned that Augie and Aunt Marie often were together with their uncle Herman and cousins of uncle Paul Richard in the late 20s.

My Uncle Augie pictured with Aunt Marie, great-uncle Herman, and two children of my great-uncle Paul.  Picture taken probably in 1929.
My Uncle Augie pictured with Aunt Marie, great-uncle Herman, and two children of my great-uncle Paul. Picture taken probably in 1929. | Source

Early Adulthood - 1930-1942

I hardly know anything about my Uncle Augie's life after he moved with the Kuehn family from Door County to Greenfield outside of Milwaukee around 1930. Augie did not graduate from high school. There are stories that my uncle left home and became a hobo riding freight trains during the Great Depression of the 1930s. He must have briefly returned home in 1938 because he was in a picture taken of grandpa and grandma's family in 1938.

While doing ancestry research and checking the 1940 census, I was shocked to learn that Uncle Augie's residence was listed at Waupun. The Wisconsin State Prison is at Waupun and it is highly likely that my uncle was a prisoner there at this time. Uncle Augie, however, never talked about this during the time that I knew him.

From left to right standing:  dad, aunt Marie, uncle Augie, aunt Laura, and uncle Dick.  Grandma and grandpa are sitting.  From left to right in front:  aunt Florence and aunt Helen
From left to right standing: dad, aunt Marie, uncle Augie, aunt Laura, and uncle Dick. Grandma and grandpa are sitting. From left to right in front: aunt Florence and aunt Helen | Source

Early Married Life on East Side of Milwaukee - 1943-1954

The first memories I have of my uncle date from around 1950 when he and his family lived on Brady Street on the east side of Milwaukee.

Although I have never found a marriage certificate, Uncle Augie married Georgianna Mason Wilke probably in 1943. Georgianna was a middle-aged divorced woman seven years older than my uncle. She had four children from her previous marriage. At the time I can first remember visiting Augie, he was living in a small apartment with Georgianna, his mother-in-law, and two step-daughters, Alize and Roberta. Alize who was mentally ill was in her early 20s and Roberta about 15 or 16. Uncle Augie also had two children with Georgianna - Gail, and Allen. Gail was born in 1944 and Allen in 1946.

Augie supported his big family by working in the A&P Bakery in Milwaukee. Whenever mom, dad, my sister Beatrice, and I visited, we always looked forward to watching my uncle's big 30-inch screen television. I also played marbles with Allen on the floor.

From left to right:  grandpa Kuehn, aunt Marie's husband, Chuck Hyland, uncle Augie, and uncle Dick.  Picture taken around 1950.
From left to right: grandpa Kuehn, aunt Marie's husband, Chuck Hyland, uncle Augie, and uncle Dick. Picture taken around 1950. | Source

Remembering Uncle Augie While Living on The Farm - 1954-1971

After moving out of the city to a rented farm in March 1954, we were too busy to visit Uncle Augie on Saturday evenings. Instead, Augie and Georgianna started to see us on the farm often, especially during the summer. We had a big garden where we grew sweet corn, pickles, peppers, beans, and other vegetables. Dad and mom would give Augie a lot of vegetables and sometimes his sweet corn was put into a gunny sack.

I can only recall Uncle Augie helping dad once on the farm. It was during the summer of 1954 or 1955 when dad was cutting and shocking oats to be later threshed. Since I was too young to ride and operate a machine pulled by a tractor for cutting and binding oats, Augie came out and did it one weekend.

On a few occasions, my cousins Gail and Allen would come along with Augie and Georgianna. Allen liked to jump around on the hay in the haymow. He used to always ask mom for a tall cool glass of milk.

Augie and I started talking baseball and the subject of our discussion was always our hometown Milwaukee Braves. Dad didn't have time to take me into Milwaukee and go to games because he was farming and working in West Allis at the same time. Augie, however, offered to pick me up at grandpa's house in West Allis and take me to a few night games while dad was working.

In 1957, we moved to a newly purchased farm not far from the rented one. Uncle Augie continued to come out and see us very much during the summer. In addition to talking about the Braves, Augie always had his golf clubs along. Once he took me to a driving range near our farm and showed me how to hit a golf ball.

As I got older and went away to college and into the Navy, Uncle Augie would still regularly come out to visit mom and dad. He always had a camera along and took many pictures of our family. It also seemed that he was always driving a new car which he beeped two times while pulling out of our driveway.

In January of 1971, dad took me into Milwaukee to visit Augie on the day that I left for Taiwan. I remember uncle driving me to the airport so that I could catch an evening flight to Los Angeles.

Picture taken of Uncle Augie in about 1971.
Picture taken of Uncle Augie in about 1971. | Source

Memories of Uncle Augie During His Last Years - 1977-1987

While I was living in Taiwan during the period 1973-1979, I lost almost all contact with Uncle Augie. My mother, however, passed on the news about Augie in her letters.

In 1977, I was very surprised to learn that Augie and Georgianna had been in an auto accident. Although Augie escaped unhurt, Georgianna came out of it with a broken hip. Moreover, while in the hospital, the doctors found out she had terminal cancer. Around the end of the year, Georgianna passed away at only the age of 70.

Uncle Augie took his wife's death very hard. Mom told me in her letters that uncle cried every time he visited and felt that he was responsible for Georgianna's death.

During two weeks in July 1978, I was on vacation in Wisconsin from Taiwan visiting mom and dad. After reconnecting with my uncle, Augie offered to take my ex-wife and me to a Brewers game in Milwaukee. Before seeing the game, we went to his small house in the suburbs. Alize was still living with him. I saw her and also my cousin Gail whom I hadn't seen in 23 years.

When I came back to Wisconsin with my family to live for good in July 1979, I learned that Uncle Augie had recently remarried. His new wife, Sylvia, was a widow who he met through a Lonely Hearts Club. Augie had already retired from the bakery and was living with Sylvia in Twin Rivers, Wisconsin.

It seems like I never could find the time to visit Uncle Augie after returning to the United States. I was first living in Toledo, Ohio, for a little over a year before getting a job with the federal government in Maryland at the end of 1980.

Mom and dad didn't see Augie that much after he moved to Twin Rivers. They noticed, however, that Uncle Augie had gained a lot of weight and was enjoying life by traveling and playing golf.

Mom never cared that much for Sylvia. Once when mom and dad came to visit Augie in Twin Rivers, Sylvia said he was out playing golf. According to mom, Sylvia didn't even invite them in for a cup of coffee.

In December 1987, I was shocked to find out that Uncle Augie had a fatal heart attack while pushing a snowblower. He was only 73 at the time of death. My family and I drove from Maryland to Twin Rivers to attend the funeral. Unfortunately, we arrived at the church for the funeral right after uncle's coffin had been closed for viewing. Uncle Augie was interred in a mausoleum in Twin Rivers.

My Uncle Augie was very good to me and I will always remember his kindness.

Standing in front left to right:  uncle Augie and his second wife Sylvia.  Standing in back are my father and mother.  Picture taken about 1985.
Standing in front left to right: uncle Augie and his second wife Sylvia. Standing in back are my father and mother. Picture taken about 1985. | Source

Questions & Answers

    © 2018 Paul Richard Kuehn

    Comments

      0 of 8192 characters used
      Post Comment

      • Paul Kuehn profile imageAUTHOR

        Paul Richard Kuehn 

        3 weeks ago from Udorn City, Thailand

        Thanks for commenting, Dianna. Actually, my uncle always beeped twice when he was leaving our driveway and not arriving. Perhaps I misstated this in my article.

      • teaches12345 profile image

        Dianna Mendez 

        3 weeks ago

        So glad you have these wonderful memories of your uncle. Your mention of him beeping two times as he came up the driveway reminded me of how our family had this habit as well. Guess it was a common way to announce your arrival.

      • Paul Kuehn profile imageAUTHOR

        Paul Richard Kuehn 

        4 weeks ago from Udorn City, Thailand

        Yes, Peggy, Uncle Augie was very special to me. I regret now not being with him during the last 10 years of his life. Thanks for commenting.

      • Peggy W profile image

        Peggy Woods 

        4 weeks ago from Houston, Texas

        It was fun reading about the memories you had of your uncle Augie. He was obviously very special to you.

      • Paul Kuehn profile imageAUTHOR

        Paul Richard Kuehn 

        4 weeks ago from Udorn City, Thailand

        Mary, thanks for commenting. Could you share an example or two of how your uncles made a difference in your life?

      • Paul Kuehn profile imageAUTHOR

        Paul Richard Kuehn 

        4 weeks ago from Udorn City, Thailand

        Pamela, thank for the memories of your uncle. I am happy that my article got you to thinking about him.

      • aesta1 profile image

        Mary Norton 

        4 weeks ago from Ontario, Canada

        It is interesting to read about uncles. They have special roles in our lives. I can remember several uncles who made a difference in my own life.

      • Pamela99 profile image

        Pamela Oglesby 

        4 weeks ago from Sunny Florida

        Paul, It is fun to remember old memories of our loved ones. I had an Uncle Lou that I was very found of, and I took a train by myself when I was about 13 from Cleveland to Cincinnati, OH. I spent a week with him and loved him as he talked to me like I wasn't a child. He took me to his work as a computer programmer for Proctor Gamble.

        Your article really got me thinking about this special, like yours.

      working

      This website uses cookies

      As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, letterpile.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

      For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://letterpile.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

      Show Details
      Necessary
      HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
      LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
      Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
      AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
      Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
      CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
      Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
      Features
      Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
      Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
      Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
      Marketing
      Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
      Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
      Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
      Statistics
      Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
      ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)