Aesop Fables’ Moral-Based Life Encounters

Updated on July 29, 2019
surovi99 profile image

I discovered my passion for writing after I quit my day job. So I began to write fiction stories, self-help books, and articles, blogs, etc.

Introduction

As I recall my past from my childhood until now, I find how I have won and lost at various points in my life. Here I want to give two encounters- one based on the well known Aesop fable moral, “The slow and steady wins the race” and another based on another Aesop fable moral, “Grapes are sour”.

The Slow and Steady Wins the Race

During my childhood when I started schooling in grade 1, I struggled with my studies and constantly needed my parents' help. I was unable to co-operate with the teachers or take their help in any form because I wasn’t fluent in English yet.

My Dad gave up on me, saying that I didn't understand anything and that I would fail in the class. He failed to understand where I was having difficulty in my lessons and wasn't comprehending me at all. Finally, Mom took over the responsibility although she had a hundred other little things to take care of. And slowly and gradually, I proceeded in the class.

In my class, I saw many boys and girls raise their hands and answer the teachers' questions in our lessons. When I reported to Mom about it, she made sure I was able to raise my hand also and answer the teachers’ questions.

Anything I saw I lagged behind I would report to Ma, and she would teach and coach me.

Finally, the exams were very near. My Dad’s menacing words, “She will fail” dreaded me. I asked Mom if I was going to fail. She laughed and said that it wasn’t true, and he was only joking.

Finally, it was exam time. My heart skipped two beats. I knew I was dead scared. It was the first exam of my life, and I knew how much Mom invested her time in teaching me. So at least for her sake, I wanted to try my best and give it a shot.

One by one every exam passed away, and I was able to handle them in a way that would work for the teacher and me. Soon the exams were over. And I was on vacation.

During the vacation was my result day, and I was all blue and nervous to pick up my result. My Mom asked to count with my fingers how many people after I was being given the progress report card because that would determine my position in the class. I told my Mom I couldn’t do that. I was too tensed to try anything.

The school bus came and took me to school. In the school premises, grade 1 was queued with me at the front-most according to the instructions from the principal. The others followed in the queue behind my back. I didn't get anything yet, but I listened to the teachers as they talked and gave brief speeches.

Soon results would be given. And the first name they called was my name! I was still wondering what was happening. I went close to the teacher as she gestured so. She smiled and handed me the progress report. I opened to see I got a 100 in every subject, and my position was first.

I was so very happy and smiled broadly. The teacher hugged me, and then I was on my way back to the bus. That was how by being slow and steady with my lessons in the class, I beat every student, going to the top of the class. It was the first exam of my life, and I performed excellently. I was over the moon and in elated spirits. Yes, I made it slow and steady.

Source

Grapes Are Sour

When I was on a job in my home country, I seriously and spiritedly yearned for going abroad and getting a higher degree, which would help me with further promotions and career benefits at home.

It was a long-enduring chain of processes, and I got stuck at every step of the way, but I also found a way out of every loophole and continued to move on.

The day I had a visa in hand, I felt a wave of relief and calm over me. I was smugly happy. It didn’t represent all my achievements yet, but it was a good stepping stone on my journey abroad.

When I reached abroad after a marathon of flights, my sisters helped me with food, fun conversations and the entrance to my apartment that I would be living from now on.

I had my supervisor fixed by email from my home country and corresponded closely with him now because I felt his research fields interested me.

Three months down the road abroad, I was falling out with my supervising professor because the research he gave me didn’t excite nor satisfy me. I thought a change of supervisors was a good idea.

So one semester I took only theory courses and looked outrageously for a professor who would fulfill my needs for interesting research. After a round of discussions with several professors, I thought I found the one that best suited me.

But again three months down the road, my young new supervisor declined to work with me any longer. There was no warning, but it came all of a sudden and without the slightest hint for me.

I knew instantly I made a mistake leaving the first senior professor. I should have worked things out with him only. Who knew- maybe it was his influence and power in the background that was being imposed on me!

I had enough, I thought. I didn’t want to stay abroad any longer. Enough of research and enough of supervising professors. I said to myself, “Grapes are sour”. It wasn’t working for me, and so I chose to leave abroad and continue my career at home.

Indeed the entire experience abroad for a Ph.D. had turned out so sour that I badly needed a reboot in me and that could only happen by abandoning abroad and coming back to home sweet home.

Conclusion

But years later, the opposite would ring true again. And I would dream to go abroad to fulfill my newly formed burning desires and endeavors. Life is tricky at various points, but I am a girl with lots of experiences. I know whatever comes in my way again, I would be able to deal with it more candidly and smartly.

Questions & Answers

    © 2019 Rosina S Khan

    Please give me feedback on my article in the comments section below.

      0 of 8192 characters used
      Post Comment

      No comments yet.

      working

      This website uses cookies

      As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, letterpile.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

      For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://letterpile.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

      Show Details
      Necessary
      HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
      LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
      Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
      AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
      HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
      Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
      CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
      Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
      Features
      Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
      Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
      Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
      PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
      MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
      Marketing
      Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
      Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
      Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
      Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
      Statistics
      Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
      ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
      Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
      ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)