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Walking a Labyrinth to Celebrate Sacred Moments in Nature

Seafarer Mama/Karen is a Life Coach who uses labyrinths as a tool for personal growth and transformation for both herself and her clients.

Sunshine Making Fresh Snow Sparkle

Sunshine making freshly fallen snow sparkle and the sun setting over our wooded labyrinth path invite me to pause to soak in their magic with wonder and joy.

Sunshine making freshly fallen snow sparkle and the sun setting over our wooded labyrinth path invite me to pause to soak in their magic with wonder and joy.

Awe and Wonder

What does the word Awe mean to you? To me it means a sense of wonder around an aspect of nature that touches my heart and makes me feel part of the larger world. Awe comes from a sense of wonder about the world around us, whether it's the beauty of nature, the physics of how something works, or the mastery evident in someone's work of art. Wonder opens doors to connection between us and our world, and with the beings we share our world with. From those moments of connection we find our hearts and minds lifted. Our world opens up, grows. We grow, too. We are present to where we are and the experience is restorative, even regenerative. We are left with a sense of peace and contentment that improves the quality of our sleep and reminds us of our wholeness.

Where have you experienced moments of awe?

What are the places that bring you joy and leave you with a sense of contentment? I usually feel awe when I'm immersed in the natural world, such as riding waves at the seashore or hiking in a forest. Walking the wooded labyrinth in my co-housing community also gives me peace and joy, and I spend time there almost every day.

Do you collect natural objects to remind you of your time with nature? I collect shells at the seashore, stones in the forest, and small branches of pine needles at the wooded labyrinth. I have bookshelves filled with these objects as reminders of those joyful times.

Walking on a Rainbow Labyrinth Path

Walking on a labyrinth path of lights is like walking inside a rainbow.  It's magical!  This is the path I built at my UU church for the type of meditation on Awe and Wonder included in this article.

Walking on a labyrinth path of lights is like walking inside a rainbow. It's magical! This is the path I built at my UU church for the type of meditation on Awe and Wonder included in this article.

Walking with Awe on the Labyrinth Path

When we experience moments of awe in nature, or anywhere, we want them to last forever, or at least the memory of them. The labyrinth is a meditative tool that supports the integration of our life experiences, and our learning from them. Walking meditation on the labyrinth path keeps our connection with our world open and vibrant. It is way to connect past to our present in a way that gives us a whole picture of who we are and what we are doing in this world here and now.

A Ritual for Walking With Awe and Wonder

  • Before walking the path, recall a memory of time spent in nature that filled you with awe. Have an object in your hand that reminds you of that time, such as a shell or a stone.
  • Take three deep breaths at the entrance of the labyrinth and hold your treasured object close to your heart.
  • Slowly walk the labyrinth. Meditative music with nature sounds in the background may help you stay present.
  • When you reach the center, pause to reflect on any "aha" moments you experienced on the path. Did you receive any insights or a new perspective? Did you feel the presence of a friendly spirit guide or teacher?
  • Stay a moment at the center to reflect on your experience walking on the path. Feel the weight and texture of your natural treasure in your hands. Does it have something to tell you?

Reflection for Stepping onto the Labyrinth Path

"All are nothing but flowers in a flowering universe."

— Nakagawa Soen Roshi

At the center there are gifts of stones and shells to bring back to us the memory of our time spent in Sacred Space.

At the center there are gifts of stones and shells to bring back to us the memory of our time spent in Sacred Space.

Returning from the Center of the Rainbow

When I led this labyrinth walk meditation at our UU church, I set a bowl of shells and stones at the center for walkers to take as a gift if they did not have a treasured memory object of their own.

The Return

  • When you are ready to return from your sacred space at the center of the labyrinth, take your time walking back to the beginning of the path.
  • Is there a special way you'll use the insights you received on the path in your life? Is there a new place you'll keep your treasure?
  • How will the insights you received about your moment(s) of awe and wonder change your life?
  • Write your reflections in a journal if you brought one. It is one way we make sense of our life experiences and develop Wisdom along the way.

What Dreams May Come

After you return home from walking a labyrinth, pay attention to your dreams. Our spirit guides, teachers and muses often share their wisdom with us from the realms of the subconscious through our dreams. Record them in your journal to re-read them. They may reveal patterns that inform and/or inspire.

Reflection for Closing a Labyrinth Walk

"The breezes at dawn have secrets to tell you.

Don't go back to sleep!

You must ask for what you really want.

Don't go back to sleep!

People are going back and forth

Across the doorsill where the two worlds touch;

The door is round and open.

Don't go back to sleep!"

— Rumi

Autumn Forest Labyrinth Path

A simple classical labyrinth path I created for walking with your finger.  It's made with gifts from our wooded path.

A simple classical labyrinth path I created for walking with your finger. It's made with gifts from our wooded path.

Find Labyrinths to Walk All Over the World

  • World-Wide Labyrinth Locator - Welcome
    The World-Wide Labyrinth Locator has been designed to be an easy-to-use database of labyrinths around the world. Information about labyrinths you can visit, including their locations, pictures, and contact details, are accessible here,

© 2020 Karen A Szklany

Comments

Karen A Szklany (author) from New England on March 03, 2020:

Thank you for stopping by, Peggy. I have a rock garden under my back deck, to which I add collected stones, shells, etc. Glad to know you enjoy both nature & labyrinths. Let me know if you're ever in Massachusetts. Maybe we csn walk together sometime.

Peggy Woods from Houston, Texas on March 03, 2020:

We have several labyrinths in the Houston area of which I have discovered. For me, walking in nature is always refreshing and good. I have also collected rocks and shells and have incorporated many of them into our garden landscape.

Karen A Szklany (author) from New England on February 28, 2020:

So true, Bill! Thank you for stopping by. Glad you enjoyed this article. ~:0)

Bill Holland from Olympia, WA on February 28, 2020:

Any walk in nature is a good walk, no matter the weather. Loved your photos and thoughts, my friend.

Karen A Szklany (author) from New England on January 06, 2020:

Thank you for your kind words, Mr. Happy. I'm glad you enjoyed my article, including my photo of our snowy labyrinth. Thank you, also, for the reminder to leave an offering for any natural object I take away with me. The wooden floor is in the gathering hall of our UU church.

Best wishes to you throughout this new year!

Mr. Happy from Toronto, Canada on January 06, 2020:

I love that snowy forest photo You have! I love forests period. And yes, I collect stones too. I always leave an offering and give thanks when I take something from Nature.

Cool article! And I must say that I love that wooden floor in your photos with the candles. It has a very earthy feel to it.

Thank You for this piece of writing and all the best for what is to come!