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Spring: Season of Hope; Looking From My Window Onto The Outside World, Finding a Way Through

Author:

Ann has a varied interest in nature and wildlife, likes to share information and experiences she regards as interesting and/or important.

Our Red, Red Robin

Keeping a beady eye on you!

Keeping a beady eye on you!

Flutter of Wings

Faint brushing against the windowpane heralded movement, drew my attention to a flash of red followed by a no-nonsense landing. Robin announced his visit, a sharp cadence to say,

“Saw you weeding. Juicy worms? Youngsters to feed. Can’t stop long.”

He left as quickly as he’d arrived, flitting to the open soil at the end of the garden.


At Last!

For the first time in months, the sun warmed the air, the clear blue sky lifted our mood and the wind had stilled. Blackbirds, sparrows, blue tits, goldfinches and the inevitable clumsy wood pigeons, all responded as Spring switched on the action.

Buds on trees and shrubs alike had longed for this day, coiled ready to spring, to announce the life in their veins. Climbing out of its blanket, coaxed into revealing its hiding place, nature’s wheel had found its momentum. The world was alive once more.

And how! A flurry of activity quivered in the bushes, a cacophony of shrieks and shrills, chirps and chatters, a bursting of feathery busyness crowded the air. A flash of grey-tail drew the eye to search the branches - where did that squirrel go? Seagulls circling above thought there might be early fish and chips on the go, this close to the Easter holidays.


Outside

Coaxed outside, I sat to face the trees, lofty willows swaying in the gentle breeze. I closed my eyes to savour the warmth on my skin. The cold, wet, windy Winter, drenching our mood only last week, had departed. My body, my heart, was awakened to this new beginning, this hope which dominated my world.

Lavenders replanted out front, raspberry old-wood pruned, peony bud ready to show its deep red velvet splendour, Forget-me-Nots’ blue peeking through. Mixed yellows, Forsythia and puff-ball Mallow, startled the back fence. All these followed the trumpeting daffodils of a few weeks back, bobbing their acknowledgement of almost-Spring.

Early bees buzzed, one hovered behind me, asking me what I’m doing in his domain. No time to bask, no time, break through the branches, balance the air, need the nectar! New leaves rustled, filling in the gaps, hiding the nests where eggs are being nurtured, new fledglings on the brink.

Now we can take a breath of Spring, pause, savour, then launch ourselves into the reawakening of our lives.


Light, Renewal, Perspective

Self-isolation has been all I’ve thought about, bombarded by news of world disease. Slowly, this sudden Spring is light upon the darkness, this lifts my soul. Hope, nature’s renewal, is in the air. Little by little, I feel my own renewal, the wheel of my life turning towards a bright, hopeful future. Life will kick back, refreshed, with a new perspective, a new purpose.


Hope

It’s a wonderful emotion, hope. It encourages us to do things, keeps us going when we might give up, spurs us on to a better life. We are more inclined to turn to others, help them, talk to them, when we have a purpose, a reason to live.

Hope will see us through, despite all sorts of problems. Hope will inspire others too. For me, the best inspiration is the hope that Spring instils, the evidence of renewal and the proof that life will keep on turning, following its true course, surprising each year with its beauty and energy.


Robin

Robin Enjoying a Dust Bath

Robin Enjoying a Dust Bath

One of my favourite birds, both male and female robins are similar in colouring and feed on insects. The males are territorial and aggressive, sometimes to the death. Having a high death rate in their first year, they have an average life expectancy of only just over one year. However, should they survive that first year, they can live much longer, even into their teens!

Known for its presence in the garden, this cheeky chappy will watch from the fence if you are weeding or digging and swoop down to grab any grubs you might uncover. I’ve known one to perch on the fork handle as I dug. The high-pitched chirping is distinctive, a cheery sound to accompany your endeavours.

The robin is of course associated with Christmas, especially for the decoration of cards. This could arise from the fact that our British postmen, in Victorian times, wore red jackets and so were nicknamed ‘Robins’, depicted on the card as an emblem of those who delivered them. They are certainly a bright and cheery sight to lift our mood during Winter.


Inspiration

This was in response to a practice prompt in Bill Holland's (billybuc) Mailbag series, an invitation to use effective description, instead of ‘The robin landed suddenly on the windowsill.’ Thanks for the inspiration, bill! I hope this helps to lift the present mood a little…


Perfect Peony

From Bud to Vibrant Velvet

From Bud to Vibrant Velvet

Inspiration

© 2020 Ann Carr

Comments

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on April 24, 2020:

Hello Lora! Thank you for your kind comments.

My peony buds are just about to come out now. I'm waiting for that velvet splendour and for once I have three on one plant and two on another. I think they've finally decided they like that spot in the garden and will stay!

Glad to bring a little hope and renewal of spirits.

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on April 24, 2020:

Lovely to see you here, Patricia. Yes, I know what you mean; Spring lifts the winter blues!

You're lucky to have hummingbirds. I've never seen one and they look beautiful, so small yet so agile and wonderful!

Thank you for stopping by.

Ann

Lora Hollings on April 23, 2020:

Beautiful description of a robin landing, Ann. Your article is certainly a welcome respite to this uncertain time right now! The vitality and color in your writing matches your subject of spring. I love your photo of the deep red peony. I couldn't help but think of my aunt's lovely garden and all of the different colors of peonies that she had! They are exquisite flowers. Your article certainly does bring hope and a renewal of our spirits right now. Just what we all need.

Patricia Scott from North Central Florida on April 23, 2020:

Simply adore spring. And while there is no snow and often very little more than chilly winters here in Florida, my heart sings with the renewal that Spring brings. So many greens, new buds, reemergence of last year's plants from bulbs and many perennials. O and all of the birds sing louder and so happily although I have them most of the year...and hummingbirds and butterflies...yes, I guess I have gotten carried away...as I am intoxicated by spring. Be safe..take care. Many Angels headed your way.ps

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on April 23, 2020:

That's a lovely comment, Dream On. Nature is soothing and uplifting, I find. There is solace there, away from the negatives. I appreciate your thoughts and your visit.

Ann

DREAM ON on April 23, 2020:

To drift away into a world of beautiful flowers and lovely birds. It makes us take our minds off all the Covid -19 problems. Who knows maybe birds and flowers hold the cure. Thank you so much for writing and sharing. Nature moves me. People confuse me. The written word teases and pleases at the same time.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on April 14, 2020:

Thank you, Verlie, for your kind words. Yes, Spring suddenly appeared as the temperatures leapt up; within a few days we knew that Winter had gone. It is comforting to see nature taking its course. Time we had things to be cheerful about!

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Verlie Burroughs from Canada on April 13, 2020:

Beauty Ann! Gorgeous descriptive write, like a breath of fresh air, and the Robin photos are lovely, all the photos, You seem to be slightly ahead in the season from here, but it's close. Forsythia is blooming, daffodils been out a few weeks still showy, To be able to observe nature going on as always is comforting and reassuring at this time.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on April 10, 2020:

Thank you Dolores! Yes, we still have glorious sunshine, though set to get colder for Monday which will be a shock to the system.

I appreciate your reading and commenting. You stay well too!

Ann

Dolores Monet on April 09, 2020:

Hi Ann - we were just talking about this - how what with the covid19, the scariness of it, the restrictions, and fear, we are so lucky that it is Spring. The weather here has been divine (but for a few stinky days) and I have spent much of my time out in the garden. Soon as the threat seemed close and I knew things were going to get weird, I ran out and loaded my car with mulch! Stay well!

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on April 05, 2020:

Thank you, Genna! So good to see you today. The sunshine is still beaming on us here and there is more gardening and fence making to do! Glad you liked this.

Ann

Genna East from Massachusetts, USA on April 05, 2020:

Such beautiful writing, Ann. Thank you! During these terrible times, you have reminded us hope and new beginnings that ride the spring air in so many ways.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on April 05, 2020:

Denise: Thank you for all that information. Interesting that hummingbirds nest beneath hawks and falcons. Mockingbirds sound wonderful. We have the starlings who often mimic everyday sounds, even car engines!

I appreciate you getting back to me.

Ann

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on April 05, 2020:

Thank you, Brenda, for your visit and your kind comments.

Ann

Denise McGill from Fresno CA on April 04, 2020:

The hummingbirds have claimed a large eucalyptus tree here. The tree literally hums and clicks. They have the cutest little chirp, almost a clicking sound. They like to nest under hawks and falcons because they feel more protected. However, the falcons that were there have moved on. The mockingbirds are very musical. The will sit at the top of a tree or pole and sing for an hour or two first thing in the morning, then again at noon, and again in the afternoon and in the evening. It gets quite noisy. Some of them will even copy sounds they hear often like phone ringing or some musical notes.

Blessings,

Denise

BRENDA ARLEDGE from Washington Court House on April 04, 2020:

Ann,

This is so good.

I love the first part where you are talking to the Robin.

Hope will see us through these days and Springtime surely helps to improve the mood.

Thanks for sharing.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on April 04, 2020:

Good to see you, Denise. Thank you for your comment. The birdsong is wonderful at this time of year. They are all so busy nest-building and establishing their territory. I'd love to see hummingbirds and mockingbirds, though I'm content with our indigenous birds.

It is refreshing and I'm eternally grateful for what I have.

Ann

Denise McGill from Fresno CA on April 04, 2020:

How beautiful and refreshing for you. I wish I had a backyard garden to retreat to. Alas, I'm stuck inside, but I listen to the birds out my window welcoming the Spring. I have sparrows, hummingbirds, and mockingbirds mostly.

Blessings,

Denise

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on April 03, 2020:

Hello Nithya! Thank you for your supportive words. I'm so glad I could brighten your day. We all need some positivity and Spring is the best thing I can think of when we can't rush off and see our families!

Keep safe and well.

Ann

Nithya Venkat from Dubai on April 03, 2020:

I enjoyed the view from your window through your lovely description. Reading this really brightened my day and uplifted my spirit. This is a beautiful response to Bill's challenge. Loved your photos, thank you for this lovely write.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on April 03, 2020:

Thanks for the information, Mel. That's interesting. I will look up the Kingbird and improve my education.

Ann

Mel Carriere from San Diego California on April 03, 2020:

Definitely a Kingbird. They are part of the family Tyrannidae, or Tyrant Flycatchers. They might be limited to the North and South America. Yes I just checked, they are, which could be why birding visitors from your part of the world get so excited to see them, whereas we see one species or another from this group every day, usually on the wing, catching flies of course. Great stuff.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on April 03, 2020:

Umesh Chandra Bhatt: Glad it soothed. Thank you for your kind comment.

Ann

Umesh Chandra Bhatt from Kharghar, Navi Mumbai, India on April 03, 2020:

Soft and soothing. Nice sketch.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on April 02, 2020:

The Robin used to be in the Thrush category here but they changed it for some reason! There are some different colourings of them around the world apparently. Swallows we have, but I've never heard of a Kingbird (or is that maybe a Kingfisher?), nor an Oriole.

Yes, we might leave well alone and think about its value more. I'm not holding my breath!

Thanks for your visit. I appreciate your comment and input.

Ann

Mel Carriere from San Diego California on April 02, 2020:

Beautiful descriptions. Your Robin is very different from the bird we call a Robin over here, which is actually a thrush. I suppose some people get a buzz seeing them in other places, but they are only casual visitors where I live.

Nonetheless, we do have our springtime birds that thrill me. I get a burst of emotion when the cliff swallows return in mid March to nest. Then the Kingbirds come home and sometimes a flashy Oriole.

I am glad you are in tune with the birds and blooms. If one good thing results from this virus crisis, it might be that nature recovers a bit from our tampering.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on April 01, 2020:

Rochelle Ann: Thank you for your visit and your charming comment. I'm glad you enjoyed this.

Keep safe and well!

Ann

Rochelle Ann De Zoysa from Moratuwa, Sri Lanka on April 01, 2020:

I felt like I was in another world, the way you have described :) I get inspiration from people. How much I try to write about nature, I always end up writing about human nature. My belief is that this self isolation is a time to spend time with Papa God and his beautiful nature. Thank you for this article. I'm glad I came across this.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on March 31, 2020:

Thank you, Peggy! Glad you enjoyed this. I love peonies, so large and velvety vibrant. I enjoy my garden every day. The wildlife is wonderful, especially being next to a small row of willow trees and shrubs.

Best wishes to you too, Peggy!

Ann

Peggy Woods from Houston, Texas on March 31, 2020:

This post of yours was a delight to read. You are lucky to be able to grow peonies where you live. I enjoyed your photos and the brightness of the spirit in which this was written. Your robins must be very tame to sit on your garden digging tool. That is amazing! Enjoy the beauty of nature surrounding you.

Best wishes!

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on March 31, 2020:

Thank you Shauna! You're very kind. I'm glad it had the desired effect.

Well, as robins are such cheeky chappies I think it's more to do with bravado than trust! But, yes, it's nice to think that they know I won't harm them, or at least a sign of hope. We have a few trusting blackbirds too, which is more to do with their addiction to raisins. Friends of ours have them pecking on the window pane demanding their daily ration! We have a supply on a garden pedestal.

Keep safe and well!

Ann

Shauna L Bowling from Central Florida on March 31, 2020:

Ann, thank you for this uplifting article. Spring and all it brings certainly screams of hope and life.

Your plants are beautiful and I learned something about robins that I didn't know. I think it's pretty cool that one actually sat on your garden tool as you were working. That's got to be a sign of something. Trust? Hope? Validation?

I'm glad you took Bill's suggestion to heart. This is a very enjoyable and welcome read!

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on March 31, 2020:

Hello Dora! Glad you found this refreshing. I got really fed up with hearing all the doom and gloom and then when the sun came out it was literally a breath of fresh air! We have to concentrate on the positive and I'm lucky to have a lot of that around me, outside and within the family.

All the best to you, Dora!

Ann

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on March 31, 2020:

Thank you Liz. We all need a little joy at the moment and the garden takes our minds off the negative with lots of positives, physical and emotional

Good to see you today.

Ann

Dora Weithers from The Caribbean on March 30, 2020:

Thank you for a really refreshing read! Your article is such a distraction from all the worry we are reading about. The beautiful nature pictures are also a mental treat. I love your insights on hope.

Liz Westwood from UK on March 30, 2020:

This is a positive distraction from the depressing news headlines at this time. Thanks for reminding us of the joys of Spring. I have noticed self isolating friends taking renewed pleasure and interest in signs of Spring in their gardens.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on March 30, 2020:

Hello Devika! Good to see you and thank you for your comment.

Ann

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on March 30, 2020:

Hello Lorna! Thank you for your kind comment; I'm glad you enjoyed this. We had 4 days of warmth and sunshine which was just what I needed. A little colder now but still lovely.

Ann

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on March 30, 2020:

Thank you, Linda. Glad you found it uplifting. Thanks for the visit!

Ann

Devika Primić from Dubrovnik, Croatia on March 30, 2020:

Hi Ann this is an interesting insight to the world. I enjoy outdoors and spring is my favorite time of year.

Lorna Lamon on March 30, 2020:

I love the beauty of nature and your article is a perfect picture of this Ann. Wonderful descriptive commentary and beautiful photos - just what we all need, a dose of hope in these times. I have to say that my inspiration is usually taken from the joy of nature, although I would have to tick all your boxes. An enjoyable walk into Spring.

Linda Lum from Washington State, USA on March 30, 2020:

Ann what a beautifully uplifting article full of Hope and happiness. If ever there was a time that we needed this it is now.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on March 30, 2020:

Thank you, manatita, for your kind comment.

May you keep safe and well too.

Ann

manatita44 from london on March 30, 2020:

You took that line and ran well with it and your different take was excellent! Here on the earth plane, we have seasonal Spring, but interweaving hope in between is beautiful and will prepare us for the Joy to come.

To me your poll is all inspirational, although, if I'm honest, my Caribbean bones don't exactly enjoy the cold weather. Yet I like the snow as it reminds me, like nature, of the inner beauty. Keep well with the family. Peace.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on March 30, 2020:

Thank you, bill! You've made my day.

The garden is still burgeoning and the birds are busy eating the raisins we put out for them - blackbirds can't get enough of them!

Safe Monday to you too. The world is getting closer in friendship, I've noticed, so at least some good is coming out of all this.

Ann

Bill Holland from Olympia, WA on March 30, 2020:

Simply brilliant, my friend. Your descriptions are first-rate for sure. This was a lovely walk with all senses on high alert, and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

Challenge accepted and completed! Well done, you!

Happy and Safe Monday, Ann!

bill

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on March 30, 2020:

Well, John, you said you wanted some optimistic, uplifting writing, so you were part of the inspiration too, for which I thank you.

Thanks too for your kind words this morning. Glad this had the desired effect. Take care.

Ann

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on March 30, 2020:

Thank you, Ruby, for your lovely comment. Spring time just makes me smile. We have another sunny day as I sit near that same window and look out onto the garden. Delightful!

Lovely to see you this morning. Keep well.

Ann

John Hansen from Queensland Australia on March 29, 2020:

Ann, I couldn’t answer the poll as I would have to tick “all the above.” It looks like your plants are thriving. We had a bay tree in a pot that seemed to be going well, but it suddenly just wilted and died. Your descriptions are impeccable, and I just love you friend the robin. Thank you for sharing this cheerful uplifting article Ann.

Ruby Jean Richert from Southern Illinois on March 29, 2020:

Ann, while reading this beautiful piece my eye's became misty, just the thought of Spring and the wonder of new birth brings me so much joy. I could visualize each flower and animal from your detailed writing. I'm sure Bill is smiling BIG TIME. I am.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on March 29, 2020:

Thank you, Pamela, for your kind words. Glad you enjoyed this.

I hope you keep safe and well.

Ann

Pamela Oglesby from Sunny Florida on March 29, 2020:

I love the blooms in spring and the birds, especially robins. It seems we like many of the same things. Your descriptions are lovely. I really enjoyeed this article.

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on March 29, 2020:

Thanks Flourish! Yes, there are several different varieties around the world and of course we have the European one.

Glad you enjoyed this and thanks for your support.

Keep safe and well!

Ann

FlourishAnyway from USA on March 29, 2020:

Lovely description, Ann, and hopeful as well. Those robins don’t know a thing about this pandemic and that is wonderful. I’m fascinated that your robins are slightly different than ours!

Ann Carr (author) from SW England on March 29, 2020:

Thank you Rinita, for such a lovely comment! So good to see you here and I appreciate your support. I wish you safety and health in these troubled times.

Ann

Rinita Sen on March 29, 2020:

Your article is as fresh as spring herself. The way you described the onset of the season, and the way in which your brilliant writing made the reader feel one with nature, it goes without saying that this write-up gives all of us hope. Stay well and continue to spread bliss.