All Gummed Up

Updated on April 23, 2020
DreamerMeg profile image

Passionately interested in life-long learning, writing, researching, and many other things. Spent many years as a management trainer.

Bair's Drug And Hardware Store
Bair's Drug And Hardware Store | Source

In The Store

I was there when it all started. Bair’s drug and hardware store, typical small store, kids hanging round buying candy, drinking sodas, listening to music. Bobby’s uncle owned it but Bobby usually helped out behind the counter instead of sitting in front with the rest of us. This guy came in, wanted a soda, then asked Bobby’s uncle, if he had this particular chemical. But it was Bobby who answered, asking him what strength and telling him he would have to fill in the register.

Old House
Old House | Source

A Sticky Problem

“Smart kid,” the guy remarked to no one in particular. But he was right. Bobby was always top of the class in science. Seems like the guy was moving into town and he took a shine to Bobby, had him over at the big old Cookson house he was renting and got him to help with some experiments he was doing.

Bobby explained them to me one time but apart from him saying he was working in a proper lab, I didn’t understand the rest of it. Later, he got very secretive and wouldn’t even mention the lab any more but he must still have been working there because his uncle took on someone else to help out in the store.

Must have been a year later and the science teacher wanted a group of us to do a science fair project. She had a few ideas for us to look at but told us to have a think for ourselves about what we wanted to do. I wanted to do an engineering project and make a robot car that could travel over rough ground but Bobby suggested we look for a bacterium that could clean the environment but be harmless to humans. The rest of the guys agreed, probably because they knew Bobby would do most of the work while they still got credit! I thought he was going to look for a bacterium that would digest oil but apparently that has already been done, so we settled on one that would get rid of gum. The street in front of Bair’s drug and hardware was covered in gum and Mr Bair was always trying to get rid of it.

Ended up one Saturday, the whole science fair group of us spent all morning on our knees scraping gum from the pavement. Bobby said the best way to find the bacterium was to search in a place where there was lot of the stuff you want to get rid of. That’s how they found the oil digesting bacterium, apparently. Anyway, we had a lot of gum and a lot of dirty knees but now we had to look for this tiny creature that might actually be digesting gum.

Bobby thought the school science lab wasn’t good enough for us to look for this bacterium and he got us invited over to the old Cookson house to see this guy and use the lab there. Mr Smith, that was the guy’s name, let us in. He didn’t seem too happy to have us there but we behaved ourselves and he gradually relaxed. Bobby directed us, we just followed what he said to do, stroking solutions onto these Agar plates, making sure our equipment was sterile and making sure we didn’t inhale any bacteria left over from whoever spit the gum out!

A couple of days later, we were able to take these dishes across to school to show to our science teacher and tell her our plans.

Now, there are different types of gum and not all of them can be digested by bacteria, at least none that have been tested yet. But some of them can. And it didn’t seem too important an experiment if you could only remove some of the gum from the pavement with bacteria. But looking at this the other way round, gum is also very good at removing bacteria and holding onto them, after all, some gum claims to clean your teeth! And this gave Bobby an idea.

What if the gum held a bacterium that could fight viruses? Viruses and bacteria have been fighting for millions of years and bacteria can develop immunity to viruses they have encountered before. So Bobby thought we might be able to make this gum that had bacteria that could fight against viruses. You would need to make a different bacteria each time you wanted to fight a different virus but if you chewed this gum, your body would be able to fight against any virus you caught. It wouldn’t make you immune of course, just the bacteria would remove and kill enough of the viruses to give your body a chance to fight it without it overwhelming you.

The science teacher was very excited by this idea but the problem was, it needed a specialist lab to create the right bacteria and also, we couldn’t try it out on people, it would have to be on some other creature - but what creature would chew gum? And what virus would we have to get rid of? Bobby told her about Mr Smith and his lab and she went off to talk to him. Turned out he was Dr Smith and a geneticist but his lab could handle this. Seems he got pretty excited by the idea.

We decided to use frogs for our experimental animals. The school pond had had a number of frog deaths from something called ranavirus, so there was a real problem to solve. Bobby and Doctor Smith made the special bacteria to add to the chewing gum. The rest of our group made chewing gum flies for the frogs to “catch”. They wouldn’t chew them of course, frogs have no teeth, but that wasn’t essential as long as they got the chewing gum into their mouths.

Well, the rest is history, as they say. The frogs got the gum, the bacteria “got” the viruses and the frogs recovered. Bobby was named as co author in a special paper Dr Smith wrote for this learned journal and our science group got a special award at the science fair.

Old Clock
Old Clock | Source

Gummy End

If I was in at the beginning, I was there at the end too. Bobby left town the following year to go to College on a special scholarship: I went to say goodbye at the bus stop by the old clock. He and Dr Smith patented the chewing gum and it gets given out on about 7 million prescriptions a year fighting all these different kinds of virus. As for me, I still live in town but I developed a machine for removing gum, so the pavement in front of Bair’s drug and hardware store is finally clean.

Comments

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    • DreamerMeg profile imageAUTHOR

      DreamerMeg 

      2 months ago from Northern Ireland

      We have juicy fruit here. I must pass this onto my daughter. She lives near a bakery and gets mice occasionally.

    • PAINTDRIPS profile image

      Denise McGill 

      2 months ago from Fresno CA

      I believe it will kill mice, rats and even moles too. My grandmother used to tell me not to swallow gum too. Good thing it doesn't kill people like it does rodents. The Juicy Fruit kind is best because they like the smell and will eat it.

      Blessings,

      Denise

    • DreamerMeg profile imageAUTHOR

      DreamerMeg 

      2 months ago from Northern Ireland

      No, I had no idea about this, Denise. My grandmother used to tell me not to swallow gum, because it would stick in my gut. We do not have gophers in this country but I could maybe try it if any mice get in! Thanks.

    • PAINTDRIPS profile image

      Denise McGill 

      2 months ago from Fresno CA

      Did you know that gum will kill rodents? They cannot digest it and it sticks in the gut and kills them. Its a way to eliminate gophers without using poison. I used to put a stick of Juicy Fruit or two into the tunnel of a gopher run and the gophers just disappeared. Buried in their own tunnels. Hopefully gum won't kill the frogs... but who knows?

      Blessings,

      Denise

    • DreamerMeg profile imageAUTHOR

      DreamerMeg 

      3 months ago from Northern Ireland

      Thank you very much Greg. Very kind. Thank you for visiting.

    • boxelderred profile image

      greg cain 

      3 months ago from Moscow, Idaho, USA

      Wow! I love this! So creative, imaginative, plausible almost. What a great tale with likeable characters and a good message about people being selfless, trying do do something for the greater good. We need more of that and less 'what's in it for me,' I'd say. Very well done.

    • DreamerMeg profile imageAUTHOR

      DreamerMeg 

      4 months ago from Northern Ireland

      Thank very much Doc Andersen

    • Doc Andersen profile image

      DocAndersen 

      4 months ago from US

      i love this!

    • DreamerMeg profile imageAUTHOR

      DreamerMeg 

      4 months ago from Northern Ireland

      Thank you very much Nell Rose. I wish it were true!

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 

      4 months ago from England

      Wow, wouldn't that be good? Chewing gum with bacteria to fight a virus.Great idea, and I loved the story!

    • DreamerMeg profile imageAUTHOR

      DreamerMeg 

      4 months ago from Northern Ireland

      Thank you very much M G Singh

    • emge profile image

      MG Singh emge 

      4 months ago from Singapore

      Awesome tale that's riveting and interesting.

    • DreamerMeg profile imageAUTHOR

      DreamerMeg 

      4 months ago from Northern Ireland

      Thank you for commenting Vince Summers. It would be nice to find a bacterium that could fight coronavirus this way, or even get rid of chewing gum!

    • DreamerMeg profile imageAUTHOR

      DreamerMeg 

      4 months ago from Northern Ireland

      Thank you Denise. I certainly would chew my gum if it were available!

    • PAINTDRIPS profile image

      Denise McGill 

      4 months ago from Fresno CA

      What a great story. If only! We need some gum right now.

      Blessings,

      Denise

    • profile image

      Vince Summers 

      4 months ago

      A really nice article, DM. I found it absorbing. The idea of bacteria on an item, away from the air, such as the bottom surface of the gum on the sidewalk, is an entirely believable, new concept for me.

    • DreamerMeg profile imageAUTHOR

      DreamerMeg 

      4 months ago from Northern Ireland

      No, I didn't know that chewing gum is banned in Singapore. I certainly see the problems on certain pavements over here. I like chewing gum sometimes but I always wrap it and bin it after I have finished chewing. Thank you for visiting.

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 

      4 months ago from SW England

      What an inventive story! Amazing what gum can do too.

      Did you know that Chewing Gum is banned in Singapore? You can get into serious trouble for even having it about your person. But then, they don't have a problem trying to get it off the pavement!

      Good read. Off to follow you.

      Ann

    • DreamerMeg profile imageAUTHOR

      DreamerMeg 

      4 months ago from Northern Ireland

      Beth Perry, you are right. Thanks for visiting and commenting

    • bethperry profile image

      Beth Perry 

      4 months ago from Tennesee

      What a cool story! Very glad the frogs were helped.

      It would very impressive if the cures for human diseases could be researched with such sincere and selfless motives.

    • DreamerMeg profile imageAUTHOR

      DreamerMeg 

      4 months ago from Northern Ireland

      Thanks for visiting Jack Shorebird. I hadn't heard of gum being used as a protest weapon previously. Interesting, must remember that!

    • DreamerMeg profile imageAUTHOR

      DreamerMeg 

      4 months ago from Northern Ireland

      Thank you very much for visiting and commenting Linda.

    • DreamerMeg profile imageAUTHOR

      DreamerMeg 

      4 months ago from Northern Ireland

      Thank you very much Lora. I am glad you liked it.

    • Jack Shorebird profile image

      Jack Shorebird 

      4 months ago from Central Florida, US

      As a side note, my Alma Mater (UCF), had what was called the Knight's Den in the 1980's. It served standard stuff. Burgers, beer and had a big screen (early version) TV. I'd get there at dawn's early crack for breakfast as a commuter and one day there was gum at both entrances--on the walk. Turns out they'd stop serving beer. Students were miffed. Hence the gum. The beer came back and the gum went away. A sticky protest...

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 

      4 months ago from British Columbia, Canada

      What a creative story! It's very original and a great response to the challenge.

    • Lora Hollings profile image

      Lora Hollings 

      4 months ago

      I liked your story! It was very imaginative and it had a small town atmosphere that I really liked as well! I loved the ending too. Wonderful job with this challenge.

    • DreamerMeg profile imageAUTHOR

      DreamerMeg 

      4 months ago from Northern Ireland

      Thank you very much Shauna. I haven't heard of anyone using chewing gum to get rid of viruses but you never know - stranger things have happened!

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 

      4 months ago from Central Florida

      Wouldn't it be awesome if we could rid ourselves of virus, cancer, etc. simply by chewing gum?

      Nice story, Meg!

    • DreamerMeg profile imageAUTHOR

      DreamerMeg 

      4 months ago from Northern Ireland

      Thanks very much Pamela, I am glad you liked the ending.

    • DreamerMeg profile imageAUTHOR

      DreamerMeg 

      4 months ago from Northern Ireland

      Thanks for commenting Bill and for visiting.

    • DreamerMeg profile imageAUTHOR

      DreamerMeg 

      4 months ago from Northern Ireland

      HI Nathan, thanks for your comment and for visiting.

    • Pamela99 profile image

      Pamela Oglesby 

      4 months ago from Sunny Florida

      This is a good story that is very timely considering the circumstances we have now. I particularly like the ending.

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 

      4 months ago from Olympia, WA

      Timely story and a funny one at the end....we will always need clean sidewalks. lol Thanks for taking up the challenge, my friend, and a job well-done.

      Happy Weekend to you! Be safe!

    • NateB11 profile image

      Nathan Bernardo 

      4 months ago from California, United States of America

      Great story, interesting small town successes! Had a real feeling of what happens among young intelligent people in a small town.

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