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Book Review: Everything, Everything

Updated on May 31, 2017
Everything, Everything book poster
Everything, Everything book poster

Love Is Everything, Everything

Everything, Everything is the reason why I enjoy romantic young adult literature. The story features 17-year-old Madeline Whittier and her inexplicable condition in which she is allergic to everything in the outside world. Madeline is more than contempt to stay within her bubble until she sees her new neighbor through her bedroom window. What ensues after is a story of love, sacrifice, and family accompanied by beautiful illustrations.

As I said before, the novel's pictures and diagrams allow the story to come life. Reading this book is a lot like watching a television series. The book's hand-drawn doodles compliment the imagination. Finishing a chapter or a passage and encountering a picture drawn by Madeline is wonderful. Each drawing is different and more importantly relevant to what you just read.

The writing is also extremely easy to read and enjoyable. Yoon has the ability to write text in a informal-formal way that makes it impossible to be boring. There is an energy that resonate off the words you read. At times, Yoon will phonetically write out how the words sound. Seriously, I flew through this book perhaps quicker than any other novel I've read in a long time.

The main protagonist, Madeline is a quirky and bright young woman who isn't afraid to tell us exactly what's on her mind or how she's feeling. It's this intimacy that allows the reader to feel connected to her. Her nurse, Carla has an exceptional and bright personality as well. The two feed off each other in many moments that lead to hilarity and just plain fun.

The story centers around Madeline, her illness, and the boy she falls for; All these ingredients SCREAM young adult novel. However, it's good! The love story is not too pessimistic or optimistic. Similar to The Fault In Our Stars, It's realistic. Everything, Everything is self aware that it is a story mostly about unobtainable love and plays off that in a serious but light way.

Closing

Everything, Everything is an exciting and light read that asks several important life questions. How far will we go for the person we love? What are the effects of experiencing momentous tragedy? Is being confined in one place without experiencing what life offers truly, living? And perhaps create an invisible checklist in your head and check off if anything applies to you. A vibrant and intelligent female protagonist. A novel with good pacing and beautiful drawings. And a love story similar (but different in it's own way) to other young adult fiction. If all or any apply, then I highly recommend this novel.

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