Eddie Dollgener

I was born and raised in Texas. I grew up in the Dallas area, but recently moved to Northeast Texas. I am a Christian father to one daughter and teach a Sunday school class and weekly program to children about missionaries through a program called Royal Ambassadors.

My goal in life is to write full-time and be able to go on medical mission trips or disaster relief teams. I work as a care giver and paraprofessional in East Texas. I am grateful that God has allowed me to find this sort of work enjoyable because I can serve and minister to those who need both physical and spiritual healing.

In July 2014, I suffered a stroke that threatened to circumvent my desires for a meaningful life. Thanks to a wonderful rehab team out of Tyler, I have recovered most of my functions for daily living. Only recently have I been able to take up the habit of writing again, so expect to see some more works soon.

My interest in becoming a writer started around my twelfth birthday. My mother gave me a book, “Little Men,” by Louisa May Alcott, that gave me my first inclination that I wanted to live an adventure filled life through written words. My first efforts at creative writing were poems written between classes in high school. My first actual publication was a poem entitled “Throw Away Child,” which was published in a national anthology.

I first began to write full-length novels about 1987. At the time, I was a big Stephen King fan and thought that writing horror novels was the way to get into mainstream publishing. I started one novel that eventually split into two completely different novels. “Circle of the Rose” began life as “A Rose for Tommy,” and now is titled “Unholy Cult of the Blood Rose.” The story was about a boy who suffered from horrific abuse and escaped to a dream world in his sleep to away from his tormentors.

“Unholy Cult of the Blood Rose” is a horror novel that I wrote to address the issue of child abuse. In a way, it was a therapeutic work of art helping me to deal with the demons in my past childhood. I do not wish to delve any further at the moment, but if you take the time to read the introduction to that novel, you may have a better understanding of the message I tried to convey.

The second novel that split from the original became “Unbinder.” That work of literature is still in progress. It will become a trilogy fantasy set in another world with young lovers, old dragons, battling sorcerers, and an evil overlord.

My latest foray into modern literature is a drama written out as serialized fiction. “Kevin’s Homecoming” represents the latest genre that I am working in and has become the most rewarding for me, both in its creation, and in the publishing aspect.